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ESTABLISHED 1924 


EDITED BY JACK JOSEPHS 


VoL XI 


Entered as Second Class Matter, April 29, 1027, at Post* 
office, Los Angeles, Calif., under Act of March 3, 1879. 


Saturday, April 5, 1930 


Published Erery Saturday at 800*801 Warner Bros. Down- 
town Building, 401 West Seventh St., Los Angeles. Calif. 


No. 14 


LABOR UNIONS IN MOVE TO 
REVIVE JOBS IN THEATRES 


NICKEL-TOP 
OOOSES AOE 
UTEST PEKN 



ORA GAREW 


Featured in 

**Philadelphia** 

Vine Street Theatre, Hollywood 


A new theatre chain, purveying 
entertainment in continuous day 
and night performances at the 
tariff of only a nickel per head, is 
being considered by a local thea- 
trical promoter, he disclosed in an 
exclusive interview with Inside 
Facts this week. 

This promoter states he is now 
working out the details of a propo- 
sition that will, he believes, cause 
considerable flurry in the amuse- 
ment industry. The following, 
briefly, are the chief points of his 
idea: 

1. Continuous performances, day 
and night without cessation. 

2. All performances continuous- 
ly new; no repeat acts. 

3. Admision, five cents per head 
for all comers; come when you 
like,, stay as long as 5 'ou like, 
which will enable the theatre to 
make money because — 

Little Capital 

4. No production costs. 

.5. Little capital required. The- 
atres and halls now dark can be 
used without structural changes 
and secured on rental or percent- 
age basis. 

6. Performances by the biggest 
vaude and legit names, name 
bands, great symphony orchestras; 
prize fights, baseball and football 
games. 

According to the promoter his 
idea is surefire because it not only 
will confer a great boon on the 
poorer stratas of mankind without 
working ill on anyone else. 

Radio Is Answer 

The only equipment required 
will be a radio set with a good 
loudspeaker capable of filling the 
theatre without distortion, and the 
only staff needed will be a box- 
office girl and a doorman. No 
ushers will be necessary as the 
hall will be lighted, and no re- 
served seats. 

The answer to all this, the pro- 
moter says, is radio. 

According to this promoter there 
could be no serious objection to 
his taking advantage of radio 
broadcasts in this way, as he be- 
lieves that once a program is cast 
upon the air, it is delivered for 
public consumption. In fact he 
thinks that radio stations might 
well cooperate with him in spon- 
soring his theatres, in that way 
tying up a certain house for ex- 
clusive reception from a particular 
station. 

There is a great floating popu- 
( Continued on Page 3) 


SUCCEEDS LUKAN 


SEATTLE, April 3.— L. O. Lu- 
kan, for many years identified with 
First National Pictures Exchanges 
on the coast, has tendered his res- 
ignation. Lukan was for the past 
three years manager of the local 
branch. A1 Oxtoby, recently the 
branch manager in San Francisco, 
replaced Lukan here. 


GORDON TO PRODUCE 


■‘Captive Man,’’ an original com- 
edy by Henry Gordon, is contem- 
plated for early production here at 
the Egan, but nothing is definite 
yet, either as to opening date, cast 
or director. Gordon is expected to 
produce the show himself. 


BUILDING UP STOCK 

M-G-M is currently building up 
its foreign-language stock com- 
pany, following decision to make 
pictures in five languages without 
dubbing. Willard Mack is doing 
the interviewing, but no contracts 
had been signed the early part of 
the week, it was understood. 


STKGE HANDS. 
MUSICIANS TO 



Acting to relieve the unemploy- 
ment situation and banking on 
their belief that in-person enter- 
tainment is a big drawing card with 
the public, the I. A. T. S. E. and 
the Musicians Union local at Den- 
ver are planning to take over the 
Denham Theatre in Denver and 
open it with stock. 

The house will be run as a co- 
operative enterprise by the two or- 
ganizations, if the plans materialize. 
Opening date is set for April 20. 

The experimental move is un- 
derstood to have been encouraged 
by the national administrators of 
the two unions, with a likelihood 
that the plan will be attempted in 
numerous other cities if the Den- 
ver move is successful. 

Counteracting Move 
This is not the first time such a 
venture has been undertaken by 
theatrical union labor, and financial 
success has followed in some for- 
mer instances. But at the present 
time, with musicians out of houses 
all over the country, and with 
stage hands also seriously affected 
by the talking pictures, it is the 
first time the idea has had the se- 
rious import of the present plan. 

The contention has been made 
that the movie magnates are pur- 
posely discouraging stage shows 
despite added receipts which they 
would bring to the boxoffice, hop- 
ing that dearth of them will edu- 
cate the public to go for the all- 
screen entertainment to a point 
where the added overhead of in- 
person entertainers will no longer 
be in demand. 

More May Follow 
It is to counteract such a move, 
as well as to provide employment 
for its membership, that the I. A. 
T. S. E. and Musicians are encour- 
aged in the Denver venture, with 
other similar ones to follow else- 
where, it is reported. . 

Officials of the local unions said 
they did not know of any plans for 
a similar union labor cooperative 
venture in Los Angeles “at the 
present time,” but they did not 
state whether such a move was to 
be expected here provided there is 
a successful tryout of the policy at 
the Denham. 


NEW STREET PUZZLE 
New fancy traffic buttons at 
Vine and Hollywood boulevard 
have the autoists guessing. No 
one yet found who understands 
one" fancy swirl there that has no 
known counterpart elsewhere. 


YOU’LL SEE IT IN FACTS 





PAGE TWO 


INSIDE FACTS OF STAGE AND SCREEN 


SATURDAY, APRIL 5, 1930 


“JOURNEY’S END” 


FOR MAYAN 


LEAD DISAPPEARS, 
SHDlAf PDSTPDNED 


Phillip Pizza's prcxluction of 
“Slapstick,” originally slated for 
opening at the Egan Theatre April 
4, has been delayed by the dis- 
appearance of the leading man of 
the company, George Hackathorne. 
The cause of his disappearance and 
present whereabouts are unknown 
to the management, who have 
made arrangements to put a new' 
leading man in the cast and pro- 
ceed with the production with as 
little further delay as possible. 
Wallace Arthur has been given 
the part and is expected to have 
his 90 sides under control by Sun- 
day, April 6, the new opening 
date. 

Following is the complete cast: 
Wallace Arthur, Louise Bowden, 
Nina Cunningham, Frank Yaca- 
nelli, Robert Foster and Carl 
Fredericks. Mrs. Jim Tully is di- 
rector. Scale is SOc and $1. Pat- 
rick Carlisle and Phil Pizza are 
responsible for the authorship of 
the piece. 

WIDIETJSnPF 

FDRCDRRENTM 


Exhibs can feel virtually assured 
now that they’re not to be taxed 
the extra equipment costs for wide 
screen during the year 1930. 

The movie industry, which had 
been caught so badly by the War- 
ner Brothers’ talkie “experiment,” 
was rather hesitant about putting 
itself on record concerning wide 
film until the ice had been cracked. 

As stated in Inside Facts in the 
issue following opening of Fox’s 
“Happy Days” (on Grandeur film) 
at the Carthay Circle, first reaction 
in local film circles to the opening 
was that there would be no revolu- 
tion, nor even a revolt, in the film 
business as a result of the wide 
film. A checkup this week showed 
that this opinion has been solidified 
during the ensuing period, and 
that the industry is completely 
“cold” toward any wide film rush 
at present. 

Pathe and Radio Pictures had 
been two studios which had been 
expected to follow the Fox trail 
first, with Warner Brothers, Para- 
mount and the other of the big 
ones holding complete ’ silence 
about their plans and evidently 
willing to trail farther back if the 
widies should catch on. 

Pathe has the Spoor process, but 
there is nothing being done toward 
making any widie at the present 
time. RKO already had planned 
to produce “Dixiana” in wide film, 
but that plan has been changed, 
with the picture to be released on 
standard w'idth only. It was stat- 
ed that one might be made later in 
the year “as an experiment.” 


25 DAYS IN CHI 


F. & M. Ideas now play 25 
days’ full time in Chicago, divided 
between five theatres. 


AT BEGINNING, END 


Elliott Nugent will play in the 
prologue and epilogue scenes of 
“Romance,” Greta Garbo’s new 
picture. 

Heavy Plugs 
Aiding Draw 
For Richman 

SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
By a fanfare of publicity and a 
series of novel exploitation stunts 
Nat Holt has made United Art- 
ists’ “Puttin’ on the Ritz” at Pub- 
lix’s California one of the best 
attended pictures in town. 

Holt tied up with all the 
clothiers in the city for nobby 
window displays, labeling them all 
“puttin’ on the ritz.” In addition 
to tieups with a cigarette com- 
pany and other purveyors of lux- 
uries he even had part of Market 
street decked out in pennants and 
banners announcing this as “Put- 
tin’ on the Ritz” week. 


News Notes of 
Dance Studios 


James Cody, Earl Carroll’s stage 
director at the Carroll Theatre in 
New York for five years, will join 
forces with Lon Murray, Los An- 
geles and New York dance direc- 
tor, who heads his own school for 
stage dancing here and who pro- 
duced at the RKO Theatre here 
for 16 weeks. Cody, who will ar- 
rive from New York in two weeks, 
will assume charge of the produc- 
tion and contract end of Lon 
Murray’s interests. 

* ^ * 

The Bud Murray School for 
Stage has engaged Professor Leo 
Darcy internationally known acro- 
bat and physical culture expert, to 
teach professional acrobatics and 

conduct physical culture classes. 
It is Bud Murray’s intention to 
combine the acrobatics with tap 
dancing, thereby recreating the 
“Acrobatic Tap Dance” which was 
in vogue 20 years ago. Classes 
will commence May 1. 

* * ♦ 

The opening last week for chil- 
drens’ classes in both tap and bal- 
let dancing in the Wills-Cunning- 
ham Hollywood Dancing Studios 
was well patronized, according to 
Walter S. Wills. Two new classes 
are being held weekly in each form 
of dancing. Beginners’ classes will 
be under process of organization 

two weeks. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

The Wallace Sisters, protegies 
of Earle Wallace, are the featured 
dancers in the new musical com- 
edy, “Jonica,” which will open on 
April 7 at the Creig Theatre in 
New York. “Jonica” opened in 
Washington, D. C., last week and 
the Wallace Sisters are said to 
have scored a decided hit. 

Earlene and Wilma Wallace are 
well known in Los Angeles, hav- 
ing appeared in many local pro- 
ductions before going to New 
York. They received all of their 
dance training from Earle Wal- 
lace. 


AUDITIONS FOR MUSICAL 
COMEDY AT BILTMORE 


Acting for Alexander Leftwich, 
Show Manager Siegel is holding 
auditions at the Biltmore Theatre 
Monday, April 7, at 10 a. m., for 
all kinds of musical comedy people 
for a show which Leftwich plans 
to open in San Francisco. 

All preliminary arrangements for 
the show’s opening have been 
made. It is entitled “Hi There.” 


FRENCH CO. FOR EGAN 


Andre Ferrier is planning to 
bring his French company to Los 
Angeles from San Francisco to 
play their repertory of French lan- 
guage plays. The Egan is the 
house under consideration and the 
proposition looks fairly definite for 
an opening within the next few 
weeks. 


WHITSON GOING EAST 


R. D. Whitson, president of the 
Southern California M. P. T. O., 
is on his way to New York to at- 
tend a directors’ meeting of the 
Allied States Association. The lo- 
cal body have only been members 
of the Allied since December, and 
this is their first representation on 
the deliberations of the national 
body. 


NOISELESS CAMERA 


A new noiseless camera is being 
perfected for sound photography 
by T. O. Tally, the man who or- 
ganized First National Pictures, 
and was the first exhibitor of mo- 
tion pictures in Los Angeles. He 
owned the old Broadway Theatre 
on the site where the May Co. de- 
partment store now stands. 


ROBBING W. C. 


An epidemic of boxoffice rob- 
beries has struck West Coast 
theatres in Southern California 
during the past week or two. In 
every case, it is stated, the same 
two bandits have been responsible, 
although they have not always 
been successful. 


ROSCOE ATES CAST 


Roscoe Ates has been cast for a 
part in King Vidor’s M-G-M pic- 
iture, “Billy the Kid.” 


SIARIG SERIES 
OF SIX WESTERNS 


A1 Neitz is starting production 
and direction on a series of six 
westerns April 14 for National 
Players, Ltd., production concern 
for the Big Four Film Corpora- 
tion of New York City. 

Six westerns for the same con- 
cern are now being shot at Uni- 
versal by Harry Webb, who is 
now doing the second with Jack 
Perrin in the lead. 

Both series are being made un- 
der supervision of Harry Taylor, 
vice-president in charge of pro- 
duction for the Big Four. All are 
six or seven reelers. 

For his first picture Neitz will 
take his company to Kernville, 
Calif., and to Death Valley. For 
the second, location will be in 
the Cave-dweller country of New 
Mexico. 

Cast is Lane Chandler, the 
lead, Aileen Goodwin, Sheldon 
Lewis, Marguerite Ainslee, a new 
find among the picture ingenues; 
Mary Carr, Buffalo Bill, jr.; Pete 
Morrison and Bill Patton. 

anti-IiTolk 

IN EVANSIDN BUSY 


Back in Evanston, 111., there’s 
a fight on as to whether or not 
there shall be theatre amusement 
on Sundays. And in the heat of 
it one faction is passing around 
the following handbill: 

“BE NOT ALARMED 
ABOUT VAUDEVILLE TALK; 
IT IS PURELY SUBTERFUGE. 

“Vaudeville is out of date. 
Evanston’s theatre operators are 
modern and know that vaudeville 
is dead. They also know that 
Evanston never did like vaudeville 
and certainly will not attempt to 
revive it here in Evanston. 

“The talking pictures are far 
superior to vaudeville and any of 
the old forms of entertainment. It 
is the motion picture entertainment 
that we are asking for on Sun- 
days. 

“When permission is granted for 
Sunday theatre entertainment we 
are assured of fine motion picture 
entertainment without vaudeville. 
At the same time, excellent dra- 
mas and musicales that may be 
available on Sunday in the future 
will not be barred. 

“VOTE YES 

“Evanston Committee for Theatre 
Entertainment.” 


OPENS SCHOOL 


Dana Warrene, the dancing 
xylophone girl of vaudeville, has 
opened a studio at 720 Garfield 
avenue. South Pasadena, where 
she is now ready to accept pupils 
for music and dancing. 


FOLLIES FINISHED 


Ben Stoloff finished up his shoot- 
ing of the Fox “Movietone Follies 
of 1930” last Tuesday night, and 
Fox execs seem highly elated at 
the job. Owing to the fact that 
song-and-dance films seem on the 
wane, it is understood final work 
will be rushed for as early a re- 
lease as possible. 


NACIO PAYS 


Nacio Herb Brown, song writer, 
must pay his wife. Ruby, $750 a 
month under a court order issued 
this week. She wanted $2400 a 
month, and set forth that Brown 
earned about $54,000 a year and 
had $450,000 royalty rights. 


Stock Healthy 
With 150 Now 
In Operation 


According to Henry Duffy there 
are more stock companies in suc- 
cessful operation in the United 
States now than even before the 
advent of talkies. 

In 1920, he says, there were 75 
stock companies throughout the 
country while now there are 150, 
which proves, he claims, that the 
legitimate theatre is in an ex- 
ceedingly healthy condition. 


Readers* Views 


Editor, Inside Facts, 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

We of the stage doff our hats 
to your publication for its consist- 
ent stand in the matter of bring- 
ing stage shows back to their 
former popularity. While other 
publications were sounding the 
death-knell of flesh-and-blood en- 
tertainment Inside Facts held true 
to the performers and never threw 
up the sponge. And don’t think 
we don’t appreciate it. 

Now that it begins to look like 
“Happy Days Are Here Again” 
every performer who is fortunate 
enough to secure a booking should 
see to it that his act is timely and 
up-to-date. Let’s not just begin 
again where we left off by dig- 
ging into the trunk and dragging 
out the old act. Each and every- 
one should strive to get the best 
material possible and build our 
acts so that stage shows will 
come back to stay. If we don’t 
then it will be just too bad. The 
theatre-going public have good 
memories. They remember all the 
old gags and songs just as well 
as the performers who try to use 
them. Let’s be new and original 
in our come-back endeavors and 
if anyone brings forth a relic of 
the past here’s hoping Inside 
Facts tells them about it in their 
reviews. 

Yours for newer and better acts, 
(Signed) TONY FARRELL. 


Oakland, Calif. 
Editor, Inside Facts, 

Warner Bros. Downtown Bldg., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

I am regular reader of Inside 
Facts even though I am not a 
member of the theatrical profes- 
sion. I enjoy your criticisms and 
editorials on pictures and on act- 
ors and actresses. 

I believe there are many people 
like myself that read your paper 
and yet are not connected with the 
profession that the paper is printed 
about. I get a satisfaction 

out of the reviews and stage pre- 
sentation articVc* our war, as it 
seems to be, on “smut” and cheap 
wit is very encouraging. 

The so-called censoring of acts 
on the “big time” seems to be 
lagging behind. There have been 
numerous acts I’ve seen lately, not 
only on the vaudeville stage but 
also in the presentations, that have 
been very smutty. 

There has been some criticism 
on Belle Baker’s picture, “Song 
of Love.” It was too sobbyl That 
sob stuff is outl” so these some- 
bodys say. Well, for myself I 
think Miss Baker should be con- 
gratulated. Her part was convinc- 
ing and I do not see why such a 
picture should not be a big box- 
office hit. It would be if the peo- 
ple were educated through pic- 
tures to be themselves. It was 
true to life. “These “real” pic- 
tures should rate, and I think they 
do. Why did the “Best People” 
run 13-16 weeks here in Oakland 
at the Fulton? Because it was 
true to life. It was real. It was 
dramatic. I say, let’s be real in 
our attempts to sell ourselves, our 
acting and our personality. 

I have known a number of act- 
ors and actresses in my time al- 
ready, and they seem “real” to me 
off the stage — why not “real” on 
the stage. 

Why does Scott Sanders make 
such a hit? Because he’s himself; 
he’s “real.” 

I’m not advertising any certain 
acts but hoping to show that if 
one acts himself, he’ll be better 
appreciated. 

In other words: 

Don’t try to be someone else — 
you’ve got a big job being your- 
self. 

Keep up your good work — and 
let us also here in Oakland see 
our theatres get an edge on their 
programs and be more real. This 
goes for any place. 

Galen M. Harvey. 


CIVIC BOOST MOVE 


An official move to make per- 
manent the Civic Repertory The- 
atre now producing successfully a 
succession of plays at the Holly- 
wood Music Box was undertaken 
during the past week when a tem- 
porary committee was formed to 
appoint a Civic Committee, whose 
function it will be to devise a plan 
to provide the financial support 
necessary to endow the move- 
ment. A definite program is ex- 
pected to be developed within the 
next couple of weeks. 


CHANCE IGENCr 
TD OPEN IN S. F. 


The Mayan, which had a none 
too successful experience with M- 
G-M’s Marion Davies picture, 
“Marianne,” is to take another 
fling at the talkies with Tiffany’s 
“Journey’s End.” The present en- 
terprise is under the guidance of 
the Franklyn Production, which- has 
a lease on the house, and which 
recently presented “Oh, Susanna!” 
there and has another play in 
prospect to follow the film. 

Opening of “Journey’s End” is 
set for April 10, with an indefinite 
run to follow. Top will be $1.50. 

According to Sid Algiers, gen- 
eral manager for the Franklyn 
Productions, of which Franklyn 
Warner is head, every de luxe 
house in the region has been bid- 
ding for this filmization of the 
phenomenally successful stage war 
play. Algiers was formerly a high 
production executive on the Tif- 
fany lot, and his contracts are 
thought to have had influence in 
winning the picture for the Mayan. 

“Decency” is the next legit 
show to go into the house under 
the Franklyn banner. 

This play by Arthur Gregor 
will be opened in San Francisco 
May 12, and the Los Angeles run 
will follow. 

According to present plans the 
complete cast is to be brought out 
from New York, though a con- 
flicting rumor has it that Mary 
Duncan may do the lead. 

F. anIMgn 

NEW IDEAS ACTS 


Fanchon and Marco have signed 
a new batch of acts for their cir- 
cuit, including Vernon Stiles of the 
Metropolitan Opera who goes out 
in the “Milky Way” Idea; Jones 
and Hull for the “Candyland” 
package; Slate Brothers for the 
“Srniles” bill and the Stroud 
Twins, heading six teams of twins 
for the “Twins” idea. The Has- 
san Troupe of Arabian athletes has 
been booked for an idea not yet 
named. 

Bob Mathews, originally in the 
“Marble” idea, has been retained 
at headquarters to instruct girls in 
ball walking, tight wire walking, 
iron jaw stunting, trapezing, giant 
swinging, unicycling and other cir- 
cus stunts. 


MARATHON STILL ON 


A skating, dancing and walking 
marathon which started at the 
Hawthorne stadium on March 5 
with 48 couples is going on with 
ten couples still in the ring. Ca- 
pacity crowds gather nigMly at 
50 cents a head and four vaude- 
ville acts are provided for their 
entertainment. Threp orchestras 
keep the music going night and 
day. The enterprise is handled by 
the Parks Theatrical Agency. 


BECK TO PRODUCE 


Edward Beck, musical show pro- 
ducer of New York, has been 
signed by George Olsen to stage 
the floor show at Olsen’s night 
club in the Plantation, Culver 
City. Beck arrived here early this 
week and is currently selecting 
ensemble girls. 


He Buys Own 
Coat Back for 
5 -Cent Piece; 


During a lull in shooting at one 
of the studios an extra on the pic- 
ture went among his fellow extras 
offering an overcoat for raffle at 
five cents a chance. 

After the drawing had taken 
place the winner was declared and 
the raffler carried the coat over to 
him. 

“Why, you 1” ex- 

claimed the winner. “That coat 
was stolen from me over at the 
studios last week.” 

It took a 50-50 split of the pro- 
ceeds of the raffle to prevent hos- 
tilities. 


SATURDAY, APRIL S, 1930 


inside facts of stage and screen 


PAGE THREE 


TWO B. O. LOW RECORDS BROKEN 


STAGE SHOW MAHER READY 
TO ‘CRACK’ IF STARTED 


I B. HOmOB 
BOES TBP mi 


LEGIT HOUSES GENERALLY DO 
MEDIOCRE WEEK OF INTAKE 


An inside source this week de-" 
scribed the all-screen vs. sta^ 
show as one of “watchful wait- 
ing." 

“It’s all ready to crack wide 
open if one of the companies 
makes a move to precipitate a 
contes>t in revival of in-person en- 
tertainment,” he declared. 

“Warner Brothers is the one 
they’re all watching. With the W. 


MLAWHIISCBME 
TB FILM CftPim 


Every frontier has its day of 
reckoning, and, to borrow from 
its own old familiar sub-titles, the 
law has come to Hollywood. 

Orders apparently are out that 
screen radiance is to be no bar 
to the utmost enforcement of the 
law, and big names in pictures 
can no longer do as they once did 
— “fix” a tag with a smile and a 
fan picture. 

This time it looks like the great 
picture colony is to find itself no 
longer in special favor. The “Oh, 
let him alone; he’s a picture actor,” 
days are gone, and the hero who 
can defeat a regiment on the 
screen must do his yessir to the 
corner cop. 

The changed atmosphere 
started about a month ago when 
some six or eight extra men were 
detailed to the Hollywood area by 
Central Station. Now, it is un- 
derstood, four additional cars have 
been asked for patrol work in 
the film capital. 

Three Hollywood gambling 
joints have been knocked over in 
the last month or so, and petty 
gambling devices, such as dice 
racks and punch-boards, have been 
eliminated. One operator, in one 
of the city’s most prominent ho- 
tels, was taken along with her 
paraphernalia to the station house. 

A pool on the Agua Caliente 
handicap brought agents for it 
into trouble in some instances. 

And to cap it all, bootlegging 
is not the open and above-board 
pastime it used to be. Now the 
rum-runners move with caution, 
and the identity demanded of a 
new purchaser must be more than 
adequate to float an apartment 
house loan from the most cautious 
of banks. 

The wild and woolly is no 
more. 


THREE SPECIALS ON 
W. B. APRIL RELEASE 


Warner Bros, has three specials 
for release during April. They 
are “Under a Texas Moon,” 
“Those Who Dance” and “The 
Second Floor Mystery.” “Under 
a Texas Moon” became available 
to exhibitors April 1. This is an 
all-Technicolor outdoor picture di- 
rected by Michael Curtiz with a 
star cast including Frank Fay, 
Armida, Raquel Torres, Myrna 
Loy, Noah Beery, Tully Marshall 
and Mona Maris. It is based on 
Steward Edward White’s story, 
“The Two-Gun Man.” 

“Those Who Dance,” scheduled 
for April 19, was directed by Wil- 
liam Beaudine from George Kibbe 
Turner’s story. Its players are 
Monte Blue, Lila Lee, William 
Boyd, Betty Compson, William 
/anney, Wilfred Lucas, Cornelius 
Keefe and DeWitt Jennings. 

“The Second Floor Mystery,” 
released on April 26, is from a 
story by Earl Derr Biggers. Roy 
Del Ruth directed, its cast com- 
prising Grant Withers, Loretta 
Young, H. B. Warner, John Lo- 
der, Claire McDowell, Judith Vo- 


IS VIDOR LEAD 

Lucille Powers will be opposite 
John Mack Brown in King Vidor’s 
M-G-M picture, “Billy the Ki^” 
made from the book concerning 
the young outlaw. Miss Powers 
is from the stage, with experience 
in the following pictures: “Mar- 

quis Preferred,” “King of Jazz,” 
“Right of Way” and “All Quiet 
on the Western Front.” She’s 19 
years old. Wanda Tuchock did 
the adaptation of “The Saga of 
Billy the Kid,” and Lawrence 
Stallings the dialogue. 


‘B. plan of building a big chain 
of theatres, covering the nation 
like a tent and competing with 
any and all other chains in any 
and all territories, the general 
feeling is that the Warners soon 
will be setting the pace in ex- 
hibition. 

“So far as we can learn, they 
aren’t saying a word for awhile, 
neither indicating yea or nay on 
the stage show proposition, and 
when they have their chain built 
up, will be the time they first 
show their hand. If it’s for the 
flesh-and-blood presentation, then 
undoubtedly all the other circuits 
will have to follow.” 

It is stated that Publix are buy- 
ing up stage acts in the East in 
a quantity that indicates they are 
preparing to meet the emergency. 
Rumors have floated out that the 
acts are being obtained for work 
in picture shorts, but with the de- 
cline of this type of shorts, and 
with the number of acts Publix 
is grabbing, this seems hardly 
likely. Also the numbers are far 
and away too much for their pres- 
ent stage show houses, and it is 
deemed virtually certain that either 
Publix intends to revive stage 
shows throughout the nation, or 
else to be adequately prepared, at 
no matter what expense, if some- 
one else does so. 

The Fox-West Coast attitude is 
paradoxical on the question ot 
stage shows. They maintain a 
policy of “being against them,” 
whereas, as a matter of fact, they 
are extending the Fanchon and 
Marco Ideas all the time, and seem 
to find them highly profitable, 
judging by the way they are ex- 
ploited. Which has led to the re- 
mark that “West Coast is unalter- 
ably opposed to stage shows — for 
the other fellow.” 

mlAcm 

TB STIIIIT M EPIC 


Raoul Walsh arrived back in Los 
Angeles Tuesday' prepared to start 
into active preparations to whip 
things into final shape for his new 
Fox picture, a “covered wagon” 
odyssy of the early Oregon coun- 
try. The picture will be mainly 
shot on location up in Oregon. 

So far cast for the picture are 
Tyrone Power, David Rollins, Nat 
Pendleton, El Brendel, Tommy 
Clifford, the Irish boy who was 
brought to the U. S. by Fox for 
the John CcCormack picture, and 
Ian Keith. 


IN “ROPE’S END” 


Two new castings preceded the 
removal of “Rope’s End” to San 
Francisco, the two former members 
of the cast who were supplanted 
finding it impossible to make the 
northern trip. Edgar Barrier and 
Gale Gordon are the new members 
of the company, succeeding Dwight 
Frye and Hugh Huntley. 


Five pictures will start within 
the next few weeks at Warner 
Brothers. 


Wins Praise 
For Work in 
Wright Show 

Ora Carew, whose picture ap- 
pears on page one of this issue 
of Inside Facts, plays one of the 
two featured feminine roles in 
Andy Wright’s production of 
“Philadelphia,” a tale of under- 
world thrills now showing at the 
Vine Street Theatre, Hollywood. 

Critical response to Miss Carew’s 
work has been unanimously cum 
laude, her work being vivid, her 
voice extremely pleasing and clear, 
and her personality one that gets 
across the footlights upon her first 
entrance, and stays there. 

Miss Carew is a picture actress 
of nOite, graduating from the sil- 
ents to the talkies with the ease 
with which other stage people 
made the change, and her career 
for both footlights and camera- 
and-mike is all set for a continued 
up and up. 



The doldrums hit into picture 
houses’ grosses on the last week, 
and two of the theatres wrote new 
low figures for the current year. 

However, one house had its best 
week of 1930, and the remainder 
of the class one-week stands most- 
ly managed to stay within a few 
thousands of average. 

The new low records for 1930 
were chalked up at the Criterion 
and the Boulevard, both Fox 
houses. Warner Brothers’ down- 
town house was only $500 above 
the low for the year. 

Warner Brothers’ Hollywood 
Theatre was the one that went 
over" the top figure for 1930. The 
first week of "Hold Everything” 
(W. B.) with the fun-making team 
of Winnie Lightner and Joe E. 
Brown featured, grossed $34,700. 
Previous figures for the year were. 

High, “Sally,” $31,000; low, 
“Wedding Rings,” $14,300; aver- 
age, $20,543. 

Criterion $4903 


The new low was written at the 
Criterion to the tune of $4903 for 
the third and last week of “Men 
Without Women” (figures for six 
days). Previous figures were: 
High, “Anna Christie,” first 
week, $28,565; low, “Hot for 
Paris,” fourth week, $5910; aver- 
age $13,148. 

“Cameo Kirby” and F. and M. 
Varieties brought the new low fig- 
ure of $4475 to the Fox-Boule- 
vard. Previous figures were: 
High, “They Had to See Paris,” 
$13,060; low, “Behind That Make- 
up,” $5959; average, $8127. 

The First National mystery 
thriller, “Murder Will Out,” with 
Jack Mulhall, Lila Lee and Wal- 
lace Beery, took $15,5(X) at War- 
ner Brothers’ Downtown Theatre, 
which is only $500 better than the 
1930 low. Previous figures were: 
High. “Show of Shows,” first 
week, $36,000; low, “Paris,” $15,- 
000; average, $23,217. 

“Honey” Weak 

The “Sweetie” follow-up, “Honey” 
(Paramount), didnt’ do anything 
hot at the Paramount, the Ngncy 
Carroll vehicle taking only a weak 
$24,000. Previous figures: 

High, “Vagabond King,” first 
week, $42,000; low, “Roadhouse 
Nights,” $20,000; average, $28,788. 

M-G-M’s “Chasing Rainbows,” 
with Bessie Love, Charles King 
and Marie Dressier, also failed to 
startle, falling under average to 
the gross of $30,281. F. and M.’s 
“Gyp, Gyp, Gypsy Idea” was the 
support. Previous figures: 

High, “Romance of the Rio 
Grande, $43,904; low, “Hollywood 
Revue” (second run), $20,048; 
average, $32,952. 

The Inspiration picture, “Hell 
Harbor,” with Lupe Velez and 
Jean Hersholt, was another which 
couldn’t keep up to average in this 
Lenten season. Its opening week, 
with Gaylord Carter’s organ solo- 
ing in support, took $16,500. Previ- 
ous figures: 

High, “Taming of the Shrew,” 
first week, $34,000; low, “Taming 
of the Shrew,” third week, $12,- 
000; average $18,229. 

Egyptian at Average 
Fox’s "The Lone Star Ranger” 
and the F. and M. “Broadway 
Venuses Idea” brought the aver- 
age figure of $11,046 to the Egyp- 
tian. Previous figures: 

High, “Welcome Danger,” $12,- 
961; low, “Seven Faces,” $7026; 
average, $11,701. 


M-G-M’s “The Rogue Song” 
was rapidly wearing out its wel- 
come at the Chinese, but still do- 
ing an excellent figure for the 
length of the run. On the past 
week it grossed $15,413. Previous 
figures were: 

High, “Rogue Song,” first week, 
$37,243 (a house record) ; low, 
“Condemned,” las't week, $8013; 
average, $23,035. 

Fox’s “Happy Days” was slight- 
ly under average in its fourth 
week at the Carthay Circle, gross- 
ing $12,795. Previous figures: 

High, “Happy Days,” first week, 
$23,593; low, “Rio Rita,” ninth 
week, $8438; average, $13,042. 

The last four days of “Rio Rita” 
(RKO) were lukewarm at $7000 
at the Orpheum Theatre. Previ- 
ous figures (for a full week): 

High, “Hit the Deck,” first 
week, $28,750; low, “Hit the 
Deck,” sixth week, $9500; aver- 
age, $16,122. 


Legit houses were 'generally in'* 
a decline during the past week, 
practically all being down from 
the previous week with the excep- 
tion of the Majestic, where the 
closing of the “New Moon” en- 
gagement brought a last minute 
flurry. 

Seventeen thousand dollars was 
the take for the tenth and last 
week of this highly successful 
Macloon-Albertson venture. A re- 
vival of “The Desert Song” now 
holds the boards there with the 
same company as was used in the 
“New Moon,” and at the end of 
two weeks they will move to San 
Francisco for possibly six weeks 
there with the lunar production. 
It is possible the show may hit 
the road after that and cover all 
major Pacific Coast cities. Mean- 
while a revival of “The Student 
Prince” is being contemplated for 
the Majestic. 

The closing week of “Rope’s 
End” at the Vine Street rolled up 
another gross of $80CK), when it 
had to close to make way for 
Andy Wright’s “Philadelphia,” 
which opened a three weeks’ stand 
Sunday night to a packed house at 
$2.50 top. “Among the Married” 
follows “Philadelphia.” 

“The Romantic Young Lady” 
slightly overstayed its welcome at 
the Music Box, grossing $3700, 
$800 off from the week previous. 
Henceforth, these Civic Repertory 
productions are scheduled for two 
weeks only. “The Hero” opened 
Monday to a great reception and 
promises a new high figure. 

Madge Kennedy’s “Perfect Alibi” 
grossed $12,000 at the Biltmore 
for its one week engagement and 
is considered very satisfactory. A 
travel picture now holds this 
house. 

Waring’s Pennsylvanians in “Rah 
Rah Daze” at the Mason collected 
$8000, which is close to average, 
although a better figure was 
hoped for. 

Among the Henry Duffy houses, 
Taylor Holmes in “Your Uncle 
Dudley” drew $5300, about aver- 
age for the house, and will carry 
on a couple more weeks yet. The 
May Robson attraction, “Helena’s 
Boys,” at the Hollywood Play 
House grossed $4300, and will 
carry on until the end of next 

week, being followed April 13 by 
Dale Winter (Mrs. Duffy) in 

“Holiday.” The closing week of 
“Let Us Be Gay” at the El 

Capitan rang up the figure of 
$5100. Percy Pollock opened up 


NEXT AT CARTHAY 


Universal’s big war picture, “All 
Quiet on the Western Front,” is 
scheduled to open at the Fox 
Carthay Circle Theatre April 21, 
following Fox’s “Happy Days.” 


MAY SHOW PAGEANT 


It is reported that the Palm 
Springs Pageant “Fire” may be 
presented at the Belmont The- 
atre, First and Vermont. 


MORE NEW YORKERS 


The New York influx continues 
unabated at the Fox lot. They 
have 22 people either newly ar- 
rived or coming soon from the 
eastern metrop to headquarters at 
Western and Sunset. 

P. A. Stumped 
As Boss Lands 
New Contract 


SEATTLE, April 3. — Shelby 
Cole, press agent connected with 
the Western Agency, advertising 
organization, is up a tree. 

Among the recent accounts 
landed by Shelby’s boss is a fer- 
tilizer manufacturing organization 
and Cole was assigned the job of 
handling the complete campaign. 
This includes display ads and gen- 
eral exploitation. 

Just who, of the many theatrical 
luminaries around town, Shelby is 
going to tie in with the gag is 
the enigma confronting the popu- 
lar p. a. It’s a great laugh and 
the outcome is anxiously awaited 
by the local slingers of superla- 
tives. 


there last Sunday in “Broken 
Dishes.” 

The Mayan is dark. The Egan 
is prepared to open Sunday with 
“Slapstick,” and the Figureo is 
dark, as is also the Actors’. The 
Belasco is about to go into its 
last week of Leonore UJric in 
“East of Suez” with Fay Marbe 
slated to follow. 


limE SHBW’ IS 

mm Bf HILL 


Rehearsals on Jack Hill’s pro- 
duction of the “Little Show,” 
which were being held in the K. 
of C. Hall, Hollywood, were sud- 
denly halted early this week with 
announcement that the opening 
had been postponed at least ten 
days. Opening had originally been 
set for April 28, and now it is 
tentatively set for “around the 
middle of May.” 

Plans of production are not, 
however, otherwise changed, it 
was stated, and the cast which 
will be used will be practically 
the same as that heretofore ten- 
tatively selected with one or two 
exceptions. Opening will be at 
either the Mason or the Biltmore. 

The cast which was rehearsing 
included Ernest 'Wood, Charles 
Irwin, Earle Hampton, Mary 
Hutchinson, John Valentine, Wal- 
ter Craig, Dorothy _ Humphreys, 
Hal Price and Virginia Marvin. 

ikeRbpTbbses 

ARE IN PRB8PECT 


(Continued from Page 1) 
lation in downtown areas who can- 
not conveniently or economically 
own radio sets; many whose only 
entertainment must come from 
loudspeakers operating in restau- 
rants and pool halls. When big 
games and sporting events are be- 
ing broadcast every radio store 
gathers knots of listeners around 
its doors. The originator of this 
idea believes that a comfortable 
seat _ would attract a steady flow 
of nickels all day long that would 
soon amount to 'Woolworthian 
proportions. 

He admits that he developed 
the idea from the stories that have 
been appearing in many trade pa- 
pers concerning theatre managers 
who stopped their shows long 
enough to broadcast Amos ’n 
Andy, so that fans would not feel 
they had to stay home to follow 
the doings of their favorite radio 
comedians. But he is not deterred 
by the reputed action of the Na- 
tional Broadcasting Company, 
which is threatening suit against 
these exhibitors. His charge will 
be a service charge for seat and 
shelter, rather than a charge for 
amusement, and he believes that 
his idea will meet with such suc- 
cess in Los Angeles that he will 
be able to spread rapidly all over 
the country and put his plan into 
operation in every major city. 

He is now concerning himself 
with steps to protect his idea from 
exploitation by others. 


IN TIFFANY PICTURE 


Mary Carr, screen mother, has 
been signed by Tiffany for “Hot 
Curves.” Natalie Moorhead also 
has just been signed for a part in 
this picture. 


ANN AT R. P. 


Ann Brody has been signed for 
a role in Radio Pictures’ “The 
Fall Guy.” Cast to date includes 
Jack Mulhall, Mae Clark, Pat 
O’Malley, Ned Sparks and Tom 
Jackson. Leslie Pearce is direct- 
ing. 


SCHAEFFER FLIES EAST 


Frank Schaeffer, representative 
in Los Angeles for “Zit’s,” has 
been recalled to the home office 
in New York and leaves this week 
by airplane. No successor has 
been named as yet. 





PAGE FOUR 


INSIDE FACTS OF STAGE AND SCREEN 


SATURDAY, APRIL 5, 1930 


Picture Revieu/s Previews Shorts 


By A. H. FREDERICK 


“CHASING RAINBOWS” 

M-G-M PICTURE 
(Reviewed at Loew’s State) 

This is frankly a foilow-up to 
“Broadway Melody,” but clifTeri;ig 
in the following points: 

The novelty of this type of pic- 
ture (backstage) has not only worn 
off, but is at present just about 
the most threadbare in the calen- 
dar. 

The comedy team of Marie 
Usessler and Polly Moran have 
been added, and that’s a lot in 
any man’s picture. 

It is similar in that, whereas the 
“Melody” has had a couple of 
best-sellers in “Painted Doll” and 
“Broadway Melody,” the current 
picture, has two big ones in “Hap- 
py Days Are Here Again” and 
“Lovable You, Lucky Me.” 

And they are further similar in 
that little Bessie Love again puts 
across that appeal which gets un- 
der the .'kin and makes what might 
be very trite situations real throbby 
moments. She’s got a certain touch 
that no one else has caught as yet, 
and it’s a deft one. 

The story is set amidst that 
backstage talk which has not be- 
come apathetic to the public. The 
story is equally as trite. It opens 
with Bessie and Charlie King, a 
former small-time vaude team who 
have worked themselves up to mu- 
sical comedy. King being the male 
lead and Bessie the ingenue. 

Bessie love Charles, and Charles 
really loves Bessie but doesn’t 
know he does. He makes a prac- 
tice of falling desperately in love 
with every new leading woman 
who joins the show. 

There enters one of the vamp- 
ish type, and straightway Charlie 
falls for her. She is the sweet- 
heart of another of the company, 
but is going to use Charlie, even 
marry him if necessary, because of 
the Broadway contracts which he 
has and will use in her service. 

Bessie spots the situation, but 
when she attempts to right it, she 
is the one who carries the ban- 
ner. Then Charlie discovers his 
mistake, and he and Bessie ai*e 
nearing a matrimonial point, but 
at the last moment he is vamped 
into marrying the other girl. 

Which carries on down to the 
final performance of the year, at 
which time an incident reveals the 
whole truth to the lad, and the 
strains of “Happy Days Are Here 
Again” are sung out with the ro- 
mance between Bessie and Charlie 
now in the clear. 

The final sequences, long shots 
and close-ups o^f the last act of 
the show, are in technicolor and 
on a big screen— -not grandeur but 
the same projection as was used 
in Paramount’s “Wings.” 

EXHIBITORS’ VIEWPOINT: 
Being a “Broadway Melody,” fol- 
low-up, and with the comedy work 
of Marie Dressier due for word- 
of-mouth boosting, this should do 
the boxoffice good. 

PRODUCERS’ VIEWPOINT: 
Whoever added the Dressler-Mo- 
ran combination to this picture 
takes the bow. They save it from 
being just another backstager, with 
Marie following the habit which 
she has developed of committing 
grand larceny upon all occasions. 

Charles Reisner directed, and did 
it most ably. Not only in working 
laugh situations to that nicely de- 
fined limit point, but also in the 
more dramatic moments he never 
lets interest lag. 

The story was by Bess Meredyth 
— or so the screen says — though 
we’ve seen it about two score 
times already, slightly varied. The 
small timer who makes good and 
forgets the little girl who stood 
by him, saith the Hollywood 
writer, is my refuge and my 
strength anjl an ever-present help 
in time of need. 

Wells Root did the adaptation, 
and Miss Meredyth should thank 
him. 

CASTING DIRECTORS’ 
VIEWPOINT: Marie Dressier 

again writes herself in solid as 
the screen’s premiere comedienne, 
neck-and-neck with the few good 
comedians. Polly Moran’s lustr/s 
is not so brilliant as sometimes, 
in the aura of Marie, but Polly 


BEAUMONT STUDIOS 

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‘SHE STEPS OUT’ 

FOX PICTURE 
(Reviewed at Loew’s State) 

Fox unleashed its so-called 
“youth brigade” for this one, but 
two of an older generation took 
honors away from the youngsters 
without seeming to find it much of 
an effort. William Collier sr. and 
Eliabeth Patterson were the duo 
who pilfered the picture. 

The picture is a screen adapta- 
tion of the old standby stage play, 
“The Family Upstairs,” with some 
so-called “screen angles” written 
in, such as a dancing contest, and 
these angles are well up to the 
standard of the stage part of the 
entertainment. 

William Collier supplies laughs 
at a rapid rate, and it is mainly 
to his ability that the picture owes 
an easy, entertaining flow. In this 
credit, a fair share must be at- 
tributed to the nice direction of 
Hamilton McFadden, turning out 
his initial Fox offering with great 
credit to himself. 

The story of the bickering fam- 
ily too well known to need repeti- 
tion here, but for those who might 
not remember it, suffice it to say 
that it is the story of an inter- 
fering, too-chatty mother who 
constantly ruins her daughter’s 
chances for marriage by her of- 
ficiousness, well meant but de- 
structive. The comedy is supplied 
by the bickerings of the family, 
which numbers father, mother, 
two daughters and a lazy son. 

EXHIBITORS’ VIEWPOINT: 
An average program booking from 
the standpoint of entertainment, 
without any draw names to build 
up trade. 

PRODUCERS’ VIEWPOINT: 
Hamilton McFadden brings him- 
self credit by the easy swing he 
has given to this picture. It moves 
along interestingly and well sea- 
soned with laughs, having no dull 
moments to mar it. 

Harry Delf did the adaptation 
well, the dialogue borrowed from 
the play being well chosen, and 
well rounded out by original lines. 

CASTING DIRECTORS’ 
VIEWPOINT: William Collier 

sr. proves that his place in the 
talkies should be as high as on the 
stage. He lends himself to the 
camera excellently, and closeups 
are his meat. Easily one of the 
foremost of the support comedy 
suppliers, with a deft touch for 
sentimental work as well. 

Elizabeth Patterson is an ideal 
team-mate for him. She puts across 
her assignment most sincerely and 
most convincingly, and her bit of 
pathetic work is excellently handled. 

Marguerite Churchill is as lovely 
as ever, and as readily wins and 
holds the full sympathy of the 
audience. Her restrained manner 
of handling her situations is most 
refreshing. 

Rex Bell, playing opposite her, 
is quite adequate to all the de- 
mands of his standard-type role, 
and has a good personality. 

Dixie Lee and Charles Eaton 
bring youth to the parts of the 
younger members of the family, 
and Dot Farley rounds out the 
credited cast satisfactorily with 
one sequence. 


nevertheless comes through with 
colors flying. 

Bessie Love maintains the high 
rating she took with “Broadway 
Melody,” knowing as well as any 
of them how to win the audience’s 
sympathy a hundred per cent with- 
out making a palpable bid for it. 

Charles King is okeh as the two- 
timing revue singer, though his 
singing moments are his best. 

Jack Benny comes through with 
an excellent performance as a 
roadshow manager, having both 
ability and screen appeal. If the 
naughty revue star hadn’t decid- 
ed to reform and marry Bessie, 
surely the audience would have 
been just as well satisfied to see 
her get Jack. That’s the kind of 
screen appeal he has. He’s ripe 
for a leading man role pronto. 

Nita Martan plays the haughty 
vamp broadly but adequately, and 
sings one number to advantage. 
George K. Arthur and Gwen Lee 
contribute bits, with Eddie Philips 
rounding out the cast. 


CASTING “HOLIDAY” 


Cast is being assembled for Ann 
Harding’s “Holiday” at Pathe. 
Mary Astor, Monroe Owsley and 
William Holden have been signed. 
Edward H. Griffith will direct. 


MURDER WILL OUT’ 

FIRST NATIONAL PICTURE 
(Reviewed at W. B. Downtown 

Theatre) 

This is a mystery story with an 
extremely neat twist, directed by 
Clarence Badger for full effective- 
ness. Add .to this an able cast, 
with one exception, and it is a 
good programmer for pleasing the 
audiences who want ’em thrilly 
and tangled. 

At times the melodrama is over- 
done from a strictly technical view- 
point, but from the standpoint of 
keeping interest up, it maintains a 
good consistent pace. The one 
“kick” , which registers as too 
much is the sudden arrival of a 
submarine at the critical moment. 
Strongly reminiscent of the big 
thrill of the old-time mellers, with 
the soldiers arriving with waving 
banner at the critical moment. 
But it gets by. 

The story opens with Claud Al- 
lister very much afraid of being 
murdered by a Chinese blackmail 
gang. In fact he’s positive it will 
happen. And it does. 

Then Tully Marshall, playing a 
doctor, gets similar threats, and 
not paying the money, also disap- 
pears. 

A British detective who “knows 
all about the Orientals,” comes 
into the case, and he, too, disap- 
pears. 

Next on the Chinese gang’s list 
is the hero, Jack Mulhall. The 
blackmail demand threatens as the 
alternative, death to his fiancee, 
played by Lila Lee. 

So Jack goes out to meet the 
blackmailers, with all the money 
he can raise, and then comes the 
denounement, which is plenty 
punchy. 

EXHIBITORS’ VIEWPOINT: 
This is A-1 entertainment of its 
type. Nothing smash, but should 
go well enough, particularly hit- 
ting above average where kids are 
among the patrons. 

PRODUCERS’ VIEWPOINT; 
Clarence Badger knows how to 
work up the thrills, and to keep 
mystery on the crescendo. 

The story is very good screen 
material, and well adapted. 

CASTING DIRECTORS’ 
VIEWPOINT: Claud Allister, 

playing the first of the murdered 
men, does the best work he has 
yet contributed to the talkies, and 
he has had a couple of very good 
performances previously. 

Lila Lee is up to her usual high 
standard. 

Jack Mulhall works too hard for 
fullest effectiveness. 

Tully Marshall is good, this type 
of part being more congenial to 
his abilities than the comedy roles 
which are frequently assigned him, 
and which he overdoes. 

Alec B. Francis and Hedda Hop- 
per both get the maximum out of 
unimportant parts, and Malcolm 
MacGregor completes the cast. 


‘PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA’ 

UNIVERSAL PART-TALKIE 
(Reviewed at Criterion) 

This is a throw-back to those 
hybrid affairs common in the early 
days of the talkies under the desig- 
nation of part-talkies. Its most 
interesting point at this late date 
is the clear-cut manner in which 
it indicates the advances that have 
been made in cinematic form. since 
the mike stepped into the picture. 
The old over-mugging and over- 
gesturing is still in this picture, 
making it at time appear not un- 
like the burlesques given on the 
Orpheum every now and then of 
the town-hall melodramas of the 
’80s and ’90s. 

The talking portions mainly are 
some interpolated dialogue to get 
the offering under the designation 
of talkie. It is not necessary, but 
is delivered adequately upon those 
called upon to speak. 

But the reaction of the public 
will be keen disappointment, cou- 
pled with a gypped feeling. Those 
expecting to have the horror ele- 
ment of the original increased by 
the talkie version will be disap- 
pointed. The big dramatic mo- 
ments are all nothing but a re- 
issue, .with some very poorly done 
sound effects. The billing given 
it locally, to the effect that “every- 
one but the phantom talks” is a 
come-on that the picture does not 
substantiate in the spirit, though 
it does so in the letter. 

The local issue is much worn. 

Of course it is the same cast. 


“HELL HARBOR” 

U. A. PICTURE 
(Reviewed at U. A. Theatre) 

This is thoroughly good screen 
entertainment. It has the elements 
of action, exotic allure, suspense 
and excellent continuity and dia- 
logue. all directed for maximum 
effectiveness by Henry King. 

Lacking a certain emotional ela- 
tion, it is by no means the picture 
to be rated among the best of the 
year, but from a purely entertain- 
ment standpoint it provides a com- 
pletely satisfying evening. 

The good qualities of story, set- 
ting and adaptation were enhanced 
by the excellent casting, best exem- 
plified in the work of Jean Hers- 
holt, Gibson Gowland and Paul E. 
Burns. 

The Henry King touches are ap- 
parent at many points in the story, 
for instance in the continual squeak- 
ing of Hersholt's shoes. This sound 
seems to play a neat accompani- 
ment to the character he repre- 
sents. 

The scene is some mythical spot 
in the South Seas. Lupe Velez is 
the daughter of a degenerated white 
inhabitant, played by Gibson Gow- 
land. The plutocrat of the island 
is Jean Hersholt. He is counting 
on the sale of certain of his pearls 
to enable him to win Lupe as his 
wife, through bargain with her 
father. The man he hopes to sell 
them to is an American trader, 
played by John Holland. 

But, of course, Lupe falls in love 
with Holland, and he becomes in- 
terested in her, and after Gowland 
has murdered Hersholt and has in 
turn been killed by a friend of 
Lupe’s, they sail away together. 

EXHIBITORS’ VIEWPOINT: 
This is very good program fare for 
theatres where the patrons choose 
their evening’s entertainment tor 
its own sake. 

PRODUCERS’ VIEWPOINT: 
Henry King’s direction is splendid, 
and he loses no opportunity for 
scenic effectiveness lo enhance the 
interest he maintains in the story 
and the locale. 

Clark Silvernail has an adapta- 
tion and dialogue which are A-1. 

CASTING DIRECTORS’ 
VIEWPOINT: Jean Hersholt 

and Gibson Gowland divide the 
acting honors in this picture with 
Paul E. Burns, the runner-up. 
Hersholt has caught most convinc- 
ingly his character of a money-lov- 
ing man who somewhat disdains 
his environment; while Gibson 
Gowland is no less good as a white 
man who has completely degener- 
ated,_ without further pretense of 
keeping a civilized code to his life. 
Burns is a one-eyed sailor man of 
pirate type. 

Lupe Valez is more actress and 
less Lupe than usual, but still too 
much Lupe and too little actress. 
Her obvious admiration of herself, 
expressed in her would-be cutisms, 
is extremely annoying, and why 
she should attempt to sing passeth 
all understanding. 

John Holland is quite satisfac- 
tory as the American trader, and 
A1 St. John gets in some excellent 
comedy moments, few but well- 
turned. 

George Bookasta, a youngster 
of about 13, does splendid work 
in a quite sizeable part. 


Lon Chaney, Norman Kerry, Mary 
Philbin, Snitz Edwards, Gibson 
Gowland, and the rest. 


PIVAR BACK AT U 


Maurice Pivar has returned to 
Universal as film editor-in-chief to 
replace Del Andrews, who recent- 
ly resigned. 


“HONEY” 

PARAMOUNT PICTURE 
(Reviewed at Paramount) 

All departments combine to make 
this a good picture. The cast is 
excellent throughout, the story is 
amusing, the dialogue is excep- 
tionally clever, the direction makes 
for swift-moving entertainment, 
and the song numbers are good of 
composition and well delivered. 

With Nancy Carroll and Stan- 
ley Smith heading the cast, the pic- 
ture recalls strongly Miss Carroll’s 
“Sweetie,” though the theme is en- 
tirely different. Nor do Harry 
Green and ZaSu Pitts manage to 
put the fun into “Honey” that 
Jack Oakie and Stuart Erwin in- 
stilled into “Sweetie,” though 
Green does well with his assign- 
ment and receives most able abet- 
ment in laugh-getting from Rich- 
ard “Skeets” Gallagher and from 
Little Mitzi. 

Miss Carroll’s personal charm is 
as appealing as ever, and the cast 
supports her excellently. 

The story has been practically 
adhered to strictly in the transi- 
tion from stage to screen, with the 
exception that some parts have 
been written in to build up the 
laughs. 

There is still the plot by the 
aristocratic Southern girl and her 
brother to pose as cook and butler 
to keep a rental contract on their 
house from voiding, the austere 
mother who brings to the house 
her daughter and the boy she 
wants her daughter to marry, and 
the cross-currents of love which 
develop for a general happy end- 
ing. 

EXHIBITORS’ VIEWPOINT: 
This is neat entertainment and a 
good booking. It’s your own fault 
if you don’t do business with it, 
though probably it will not hit as 
heavily as did “Sweetie.” 

PRODUCERS’ VIEWPOINT: 
Direction by Wesley Ruggles is 
excellent, with a perfect interweav- 
ing of comedy and more serious 
moments. A negro jubilee scene, 
in which is introduced “Sing, You 
Sinners,” is worthy of special men- 
tion for its excellent directorial 
handling. 

Herman J. Mankiewicz did the 
adaptation and dialogue cum laude. 

“Sing, You Sinners” has the po- 
tentialities for being another “Hal- 
lelujah,” while other good tunes 
abound, including “Let’s Be Do- 
mestic,” “Honey” and “In My Lit- 
tle Hope Chest.” 

CASTING DIRECTORS’ 
VIEWPOINT: Nancy Carroll is 

as engaging as ever, and handles 
her role for the appeal she always 
draws. 

Stanley Smith is quite satisfac- 
tory as her sweetheart, though not 
called upon for any very difficult 
moments. 

Richard “Skeets” Gallagher was 
admirably cast as the brother-but- 
ler, with Harry Green having a 
funny but not his funniest part as 
a Jewish detective. 

I.illian Roth exhibits both ability 
and good screen presence as the 
daughter of the society mother, the 
latter part being admirably done by 
Jobyna Howland. 

Little Mitzi does the kid part to 
perfection, having both troupership 
and a good talent for putting 
across songs. 

ZaSu Pitts and Charles Sellon 
complete the cast. 


R-K-O BUYS LAND 


R-K-O Studios have purchased 
150 by 2300 feet on Marathon 
Street and North Windsor Boule- 
vard. adjacent to present studio 
property at Melrose and Cower. 


EARLE WALLACE 

Alway* Bu*y Developing Dancing Star* but Never Too Bu*y 
to Create and Produce 

Original DANCE ROUTINES and REVUES That Sell 
Belmont Theatre Bldg., Fir*t and Vermont 
Phone Exposition 1196 Lo* Angele*, Calif. 



SU5 MURRAY 




(Associate*) 
Gladys Murray 
Lafe Page 


S636 BEVERLY BLVD. — Los Angeles — Tel. DTT. 6721 

PRACTICAL STAGE TRAINING 
STAGE TAP DANCING (In All Its Branches) 
BzfLLEr— iSqle) B, SIGNOR G. V. ROSI 



SATURDAY, APRIL 5, 1930 


INSIDE FACTS OF STAGE AND SCREEN 


PAGE FIVE 


BIG STAGE SHOW FOR NEW PAN 


THINK NEW CODE MEANS END 
OF MOVE FOR CENSORSHIP 


Whatever slight chance_ there 
was for the fanatics to obtain laws 
for more stringent censorship of 
pictures than now exist in the 
various states has been completely 
frustrated by the action of the 
Will Hays office in announcing a 
new code of ethics in the produc- 
tion and distribution of pictures, 
was the opinion this week con- 
cerning the code, made public 
Monday. 

The industry, by and large, 
seemed to consider the financial 
aspects rather than the ethical im- 
port, and in such consideration 
they declared the move one with 
excellent results in prospect. There 
was no question that the talkies 
were raising a problem, through a 
beliet which some studios seemed 
to entertain that at least one, and 
preferably several, very broad 
lines or situations must be in- 
stilled into every picture to give 
it that illusory something known 
as boxoffice. The pro-cens'orites 
were finding in this a ready argu- 
ment for various schemes which 
doubtlessly would, if carried to 
their hoped for limit, caused regu- 

PLmilSEWILL 
PIIOOUCE ‘PARIS’ 


A legit production of “They 
Had To See Paris” opens at the 
Pasadena Community Playhouse 
April 10. George Reis is cast in 
the role taken in the picture by 
Will Rogers. Reis was featured 
in the recent revival of “Our 
American Cousin.” Alice Eliot 
Hodgkin has the Irene Rich sup- 
porting role. 

Others in the cast are Lucy 
Leach, Charles Bruins, Leonie 
Pray, Richard Yates, Robert Kreis- 
man, Howard Earling, Eugart 
Yerian, John Gayley, Oslow Stev- 
enson, A1 Willard and Jane K. 
Loofbourrow. 


Mack Bissett, of the Bissett 
Dancing Studios, is training mixed 
^oups of 14 for booking intact 
into stage shows. The latest such 
group to be graduated, opens soon 
in a Fanchon and Marco Idea. 


BENEFIT DRIVE SET 


The N. V. A. benefit is to be 
held this year on April 23 at the 
Shrine Auditorium. At a pre- 
liminary meeting called by Harold 
B. Franklin, West Coast president, 
those present included J. J. Mur- 
dock, Moe Silver of the Warner 
Circuit, Harry Weber, Gus Eys- 
sel of Publix, Frank Vincent and 
Cliff Work of RKO, and Fred 
Beetson of the Hays office. 


TEAM HAVE SPOT 


Baron Emerson and Count 
Baldwin, vaude team, have a dine- 
and-dance spot known as “The 
Chateau” at 12923 Washington 
boulevard. Culver City. Motto of 
the place is “Horn in with the 
Nobility.” 


•lation of the picture industry by 
a few submerged egos whose ob- 
ject is to destroy and to harm 
rather than one of helpfulness. 

By cutting the Gordian knot of 
how close pictures can skim to 
naughtiness and putting the whole 
question on an extremely elevated 
plane. Hays has served up a 
knockout to the antis, it is gen- 
erally felt. 

Exhibs and film exchange men 
are wondering, however, how the 
public will take to pictures made 
under the new code now that 
they’ve become rather well fed 
with the broad stuff which some 
of the studios have been serving. 

High Points 

High points of the new code 
follow: 

That every effort shall be made 
to reflect in drama and entertain- 
ment the better standards of life; 

That law, natural or human, 
shall not be ridiculed; 

That sympathy shall not be cre- 
ated for the violation of the law. 

That crimes against law shall 
never be presented in such a way 
as to throw sympathy with the 
crime as against law and justice; 

That acts of murder or brutality 
shall be presented only in such a 
way as will not inspire imitation; 

That methods of crime shall 
not be presented in explicit detail 
on the screen; 

That revenge in modern times 
shall not be justified as a motive; 

That the use of liquor in Ameri- 
can life shall be restricted to the 
actual requirements of character- 
ization or plot. 

About Marriage 

That the sanctity of the institu- 
tion of marriage and the home 
shall be upheld; 

That adultery shall not be ex- 
plicitly treated or justified; 

That scenes of passion shall not 
be introduced when not essential 
to the plot; 

Sex perversion or any inference 
of it is forbidden on the screen; 

The subject of white slavery 
shall not be treated on the screen. 

“Good taste and a proper re- 
gard for the sensibilities of the 
audience must regulate the treat- 
ment of low, unpleasant, although 
not necesarily evil, subjects. 

No film or episode may throw 
ridicule on any religious faith. 

Other Provisions 

Ministers of religion in their 
character of ministers of religion 
should not be used as comic char- 
acters or as villains. 

The use of the Flag shall be 
consistently respectful. 

The history, institutions, promi- 
nent people and citizenry of other 
nations shall be represented fairly. 

Pointed profanity is forbidden. 

Obscenity in word, gesture, ref- 
erence, song, joke, or by sugges- 
tion, is forbidden. 

Dances which emphasize inde- 
cent movements are to be regarded 
as obscene. 

Indecent or undue exposure is 
forbidden. 

“Such subjects as hangings or 
electrocutions, third-degree meth- 
ods, brutality, apparent cruelty to 
children or animals, must be 
treated, the Code provides, within 
the careful limits of good tastes.” 
Companies Subscribing 

To date, the companies that 
have subscribed to the new code 
of principles are: 

Art Cinema Corporation (United 
Artists) ; Christie Film Company, 
Inc.; Columbia Pictures Corpora- 
tion; Cecil B. De Mille Produc- 
tions, Inc.; Educational Studios, 
Inc.; First National Pictures, Inc.; 
Fox Film Corporation; Gloria 
Productions, Inc.; Samuel Gold- 
wyn, Inc.; Inspiration Pictures, 
Inc.; Harold Lloyd Corporation; 
Metro-Goldwyn -Mayer Studios. 
Inc.; Paramount - Famous - Lasky 
Corporation; Pathe Studios, Inc.; 
RKO Productions, Inc.; Hal 
Roach Studios, Inc.; Mack Sennett 
Studio; Tiffany Productions, Inc.; 
Universal Pictures Corporation; 
and AVarner Bros. Pictures, Inc. 


CHANGE COLOR PLAN 


‘Sweet Kitty Bellairs,” the most 
pretentious of Warner Bros.’ spe- 
cials on the 1930 list, will not be 
filmed in color, as was planned. 
It is said that the picture lends 
itself more readily to black and 
white filming. 


James 

Madison 


A uthor 

AND 

RIST 


465 South Detroit St. 
Los Angeles 

(Phone ORegon 9497 



E 





ms IT PHES 


Despite printed stories to the 
contrary, the new Pantages Thea- 
tre in Hollywood will have a 
stage show policy, it was learned 
this week. 

The opening show will be a spe- 
cially-produced elaborate offering 
with approximately 60 people in it, 
it is stated. 

Thereafter it is expected the 
Fanchon and Marco “Ideas” will 
play this house instead of the 
Egyptian, maybe getting them for 
their first Los Angeles showing, 
and following a break-in week at 
the Fox-Colorado Theatre, Pasa- 
dena. Slim Martin and his Or- 
chestra will be the music. 

Egyptian Plans 

The Egyptian is understood to 
be slated for a second run picture 
policy, following showing at the 
Pantages house, with W. C. vaude- 
ville for stage entertainment, or 
else the house is up for disposal 
to an independent. One strong re- 
port has it that Sid Grauman, who 
opened the Egyptian, will take it 
back again and turn it into a run 
house for specials, with a revival 
of the Grauman prologues for 
which he was famous. 

Name of the new house will be 
the Pantages-Hollywood. 

Stories that the house would be 
all-screen followed announcement 
that Pantages and the West Coast 
had signed an agrement for op- 
eration by the latter. The con- 
tract is for five years, providing 
for a 50-50 split between the two 
groups, and with provision that 
management shall be by Alexander 
Pantages’ two sons, Rodney and 
Lloyd.) 

Picture Not Set 

The opening picture has not yet 
been set, but it is reported that 
negotiations are still on for Cad- 
do’s “Hell’s Angels.” After the 
opener, which, if this big picture 
is obtained, will be a gala one 
with spotlights and a gathering of 
the theatrical elite, and with a 
two-a-day policy, the house will go 
on a weekly change basis. Prices 
will be the same as those now at 
the Egyptian, which are a 65-cent 
top. 

Opening date is not yet definite, 
but is planned for either the sev- 
enth or the fifteenth of May. 

The house, built at a cost of 
approximately $1,200,000, will seat 
2746. 




E' 




A revival a{ “The Student 
Prince” is being considered for 
production at the Majestic The- 
atre. to open probably about a 
week after the “Desert Song” 
closes. 

The production is not as yet 
definitely decided on. but audi- 
tions are being held and some 
tentative casting being done pend- 
ing a closing of the proposition. 

Julian Fowlks has charge of the 
production, and while no confirma- 
tion is forthcoming it is generally 
understood he is acting for Louis 
Macloon and Lillian Albertson, 
the producers of “New Moon” and 
“Desert Song.” 

If “The Student Prince” goes 
into production it will require an 
entirely new cast, as the present 
company at the Majestic leaves 
for San Francisco to show the 
“New Moon” there for probably 
six weeks, with a roadshow to.ur 
of the coast a possibility after 
that. 


TRADEMARKS MEANING MORE 
TO PUBLIC IN TALKIE ERA 

One noticeably growing tendencyf cast and directed. But it didn’t 


TO STAGE MINSTRELS 


Joe Feder, of the Patrick and 
Marsh office, will stage the Mary- 
land Minstrels, an annual affair at 
the Maryland Hotel, Pasadena. 


PAUL SMITH HURT 


Paul Smith, writer of many well 
known musical shows as well as a 
number of recognized vaudeville 
acts, fell and broke a collar bone 
and is confined to his bed. 


among the picture theatre patrons 
is to select pictures by producers’ 
names, according to a slice of 
opinion gathered from exhibs both 
here and in smaller towns here- 
abouts. 

The general comment was that 
currently there is a big,ger trend to- 
ward shopping by trademark than 
there has been at any time since 
the very early days of Fox, Es- 
sanay. Triangle, etc. 

The smashing of the old star 
system by the New York influx 
caused the change, it is stated, 
with patrons finding that a star 
name, if in a weak story and with 
a poor supporting cast, meant a 
bad evening. They were no longer 
content merely to sit and gaze at 
their idol. That idol, if in an in- 
appropriate feature, didn't mean 
a thing. 

Then came the new hits from 
the stage, people such as Law- 
rence 'Tibbett, Maurice Chevalier, 
Winnie Lightner, Nancy Carroll, 
Ruth Chatterton, et al., and the 
revival of such former faded fa- 
vorites as Bessie Love and Lila 
Lee. not to mention the stellar 
ascent of silent day so-sos, such 
as Warner Baxter. But even 
above this the supporting casts 
developed such potentialities for 
drawing power that an all-round 
good cast became a greater in- 
surer of a good boxoffice invest- 
ment than any one name. 

Seek Guarantee 

The public got wise that the 
way to be assured of a good pic- 
ture, star, support and story,- was 
to purchase by the producers’ 
name, the exhibs say, and a sur- 
prising increase has been shown 
in telephone queries to who made 
the picture under discussion, and 
who else is in the cast besides the 
lead. 

The star system will continue, 
it is stated, but the wise exhib is 
giving a more prominent play than 
ever before to the support and to 
the name of the manufacturing 
plant. Instance after instance was 
cited in which exhibs ascribed 
more than 50 per cent of the 
draw to support players and an- 
other hefty percentage to that of 
the studio. Which leads to the 
conclusion that the wrecking of 
a star is even more simple now- 
adays than formerly. And, vice 
versa, it is far easier to make one. 
Take any personable players of 
above average ability and give 
them a series of good vehicles, 
and the chances are good that 
they’ll turn into real draws, the 
exhibs claim. One instance of 
meteoric rise since the coming of 
the talkies is cited as an outstand- 
ing example. This fern star, who 
is distinctly middle grade in ap- 
pearance, ability and appeal, has 
gone over with a big bang merely 
because every one of her vehicles 
has been actress-proof and with 
a supporting cast which was so 
good that the picture generally 
was stolen from her. But she gets 
the credit. 

Two Cases 

Another fern star, who was big 
in the silent days, is fading as 
rapidly as the other is rising, it 
is said, and for no reason except 
that she is put in one vehicle after 
another without that which the 
public desires. The latter out- 
troupes the former ten to one, and 
also has it on her in looks and 
screen magnetism, but all of her 
pictures are dragged down by the 
nature of the stories selected for 
her. 

Of course. they admit, no 
amount of good stories or good 
support can altogether salvage a 
star who is falling by his or her 
own weight. For instance, “Foot- 
lights and Fools” was both a 
neat enough story and was well 


save Colleen Moore. And Corinne 
Griffith’s pictures were well put 
together, but she also is currently 
among those missing. And Armida, 
by her vivid personality and 
ability, has flashed across the 
Latin-American firmament to dim 
whatever radiance Lupe Valez and 
Dolores Del Rio had in the silents, 
despite better chances the latter 
two had. 

Another phase of the new shop- 
ping trend, it is declared, is the 
added significance of directors’ 
names. The public is more and 
more learning to trust directors 
who have given them good pic- 
tures consistently, and to feel that 
this is a guarantee of good talkie 
entertainment. 

All of which is founded on the 
fact that it takes but little to mar 
a talkie, and the public doesn’t 
want to see them marred, and for 
security against such a calamity is 
taking cognizance of star, sup- 
porting cast, director and pro- 
ducer much more strongly than 
for years. 



TO 00 ‘SKIPPf 


Conflicting stories arose during 
the past week as to what studio 
was to shoot “Skippy,” from the 
kid cartoon strip. 

The first story that went the 
rounds was that Warner Brothers 
had placed Davie Lee under con- 
tract to play the title role in a 
series of the “Skippy” comics. 

Then word came that Paramount 
had bought the rights to the strip 
and were to shoot the pictures at 
their New York studios under di- 
rection of Monta Bell. And the 
last version was the one that held, 
Warner Brothers stating that the 
information concerning them was 
not true, that they were not doing 
“Skippy,” and that Davie Lee was 
not under contract to them. . 

ROSENER AT W. B. 


George Rosener, playwright and 
author, has been signed by War- 
ner Brothers to write and adapt. 
Among Rosener’s stage .plays is 
“She Got What She Wanted,” 
“Speakeasy,”^ “My Maryland” and 
others. It is understood Warner 
will make “She Got What She 
Wanted.” which they purchased 
from Rosener. 


SIGN WODEHOUSE 

P. G. Wodehouse has been 
signed under long-term contract 
for M-(J-M’s writing department. 


'oJTeeDan's 



719)4 So. Hill St. 

LOSAN(3ELES 

PhoneTlU.r6630 


NOW ON 
SECOND WEEK 


SYD RAY 

And His Coffee Dan Brigade 
Appearing Nightly 

Callers — Teck Murdock (EKO); 
Jess Petty (Pittsburg Pirates); Guy 
Bush (Chicago Cubs) and a host of 
Dther celebrities. 


HERBERT’S 


Good Food With Giurtesy 
OPEN ALL NIGHT 


745-749 South Hill Street 


Los Angeles 


Bachelor Hotel & Grill 


151-159 Powell Street 


San Francisco 



PAGE SIX 


INSIDE FACTS OF STAGE AND SCREEN 


SATURDAY, APRIL S, 1930 



Published Every Saturday 

One Year - $4.00 Foreign - $5.00 


Advertising Rates on Application 

As a bi-monthly publication : Entered as Second Qass Matter, No- 
vember 17, 1924, at the Post Office at Los Angeles, California, under 
the Act of March 3, 1879. 

As a weekly publication : Entered as Second Qass Matter, April 
29, 1927, at the Post Office at Los Angeles, California, under the Act 
of March 3, 1879. 

PublU^d by 

Inside Facts Publishing Company, Inc. 

800-801 Warner Bros. Downtown Bldg., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Telephone TUcker 7832 

JACK JOSEPHS ------ President and Editor 

ARTHUR WhL GREEN - - - - Vice Pres, and Counsel 

WILLIAM C. OWENS ... Secretary and General Manager 

Vol. XI Saturday, April 5, 1930 No. 14 


There wa.s a time when economy was the prime watch- 
word of the Hollywood casting offices, and underbidding for 
jobs frequently proved a profitable thing for the under- 
bidders. 

But those days have passed — with but a few exceptions — 
and much to the betterment of pictures. The job of casting 
director has become much less of a business and much more 
of an art than formerly, and an inastute man at this key posi- 
tion in studio activity may do damage far beyond anything 
which could occur in the silent days. 

To begin with, one false note in a talking picture can do 
something such an off-stroke never could do in the silents : 
it can completely undo all the frame of mind which the pic- 
ture has built up. A palpable bit of acting, coming at a cru- 
cial moment, may jerk the whole audience out of its illusory 
state of appreciation and bring the whole product down to 
the basis of a manufactured thing with obvious mechanical 
creakings. A bit player can do this harm as easily as a fea- 
tured player or a star, and the casting director who, to make 
a better showing of some $5 or $10 a day on his expense 
sheet, will deliberately pass by the best available talent for 
the part, within bounds of reason, of course, has but little 
regard for the real best interests of the studios. There are 
rtill such casting directors, but they are as archaic as are the 
principles to which they cling. 

There is also a sound business reason for the change in 
tactics. Talking pictures are expensive things to make, con- 
sidering all the mechanical equipment necessary, the lavish- 
ness of the sets now current in many of them and the high 
salaries which good sound experts command. If a picture 
is costing around $1C>0 a minute, which is by no means a 
high figure for them, that adds up to $6000 an hour. A cast- 
ing director who hires an incompetent person, saving thereby 
perhaps $100 a week, is indeed a poor business man if his 
incompetent'holds up production for so much as two minutes, 
and an absolute business dud if the incompetent one stretches 
his incompetency to the length of an hour. For that writes 
a loss of $5900 against the studio, all entirely unnecessary. 

The public is profiting by this double-barreled reason for 
more careful casting. And so are those studios which have 
casting directors who are guiding themselves by the new 
principles, as most of them are. The one or two which are 
not should have a going-over by the v. p.’s in charge of 
production. Talkies, like well-built houses, cannot be made 
without solid bricks, and they are gathered, or else not gath- 
ered, right in the casting offices. 


ROY MACK TO N. Y. 


TEL-A-PHONEY 

JAMES MADISON 



Roy Mack, after almost a year 
on the coast as a director of War- 
ner Brothers’ shorts, will leave for 
New York in two weeks to resume 
his activities as a director of short 
reels at the east coast Studios. 


LOBBY FEATURE 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
Don George is featuring “A Lit- 
tle Smile” in the lobby entertain- 
ment of the Paramount. Geo. B. 
L. Braun, publisher of the num- 
ber, supplies the house with a 
baby piano for the lobby. 


Says: 

Plenty of whoopee all week. 
Big crowds down and lots of 
laughs, ily old pal, Frank 
Hamilton, in town. Big Sur- 
prise Events every night next 
week, 

• • •• 

P. 8. — The CELLAR is at 
Cosmo Street end Hollywood 
BonleTard . . . between Vine 
and Oahnenga . . . the phone 
numbers are CRanite 8 8 8 2 
and Hollywood 8 15 0 . . . 
parking is free at the lot 
aeross from the CELLAR . . . 
the CHRYSLER and SAM- 
SONS are there. 


Thank You. 


MANY ATTEND ANNUAL 
BREAKFAST OF GUILD 


The Sixth Annual Communion 
of the members of the Catholic 
Motion Picture Guild took place 
Sunday morning, March 30. in the 
Church of the Good Shepherd, 
Beverly Hills, at the 8:30 Mass. 
Right Reverend Monsignor Caw- 
ley officiated at the Mass and de- 
livered the sermon. Holy Com- 
rnunion was distributed by Mon- 
signor Cawley to hundreds of the 
members who received in a body. 

Immediately following the Mass, 
the members gathered at the Bev- 
erly Hills Hotel where breakfast 
was served. Monsignor Cawley 
was guest of honor and John Ste- 
ven McCroarty, author of the 
‘‘Mission Play.” was the principal 
speaker of the occasion. James 
Ryan, the president of the Guild, 
presided and introduced the vice 
president of the Guild, Johnny 
Hines, who acted as toastmaster. 
Father Mullins, the chaplain of 
the Guild, addressed the members. 
Among the film notable in attend- 
ance were May McAvoy, Josephine 
Dunn, Nancy Drexel, Sarah Pa- 
den, Jack Coogan, Sr., Jackie Coo- 
gan. Sam Taylor, A1 Cooks, Bill 
Cody, Jimmy Gleason, June Coll- 
yer, John J. Gain. C. E. Sulli- 
van, George O’Brien and Junior 
Coghlan. 


WARNER WRITER 


Wilson Collison, author of light 
comedies and bedroom farces, has 
been added to the scenario staff 
at Warners. 


U BUDGET FOB 20 
IS TWELVE MILLION 


For its coming program. Uni- 
versal will produce 20 pictures at 
an expenditure formerly spread 
over 50 pictures. The picture bud- 
get approximates $12,000,000. This 
announcement, made this week, 
stated also that a proportionately 
smaller number of short pictures 
will be made with concentration 
on short features of the highest 
caliber, like the George Sydney- 
Charlie Murray series and others 
produced in an even more elab- 
orate manner than the Collegians 
and the Leather Pusher series. 

A third phase of the statement 
said there would be an elimination 
of brands and brand names, with 
each production to stand on its 
own merits. 

It was stated further that there 
will be installed on the lot the 
individual handling of individual 
units in the studios. Carl Laemmle, 
Jr., general manager in charge of 
production, said he is firmly con- 
vinced that great pictures result 
from the unit production system, 
and that he is determined to sur- 
round himself with capable associ- 
ate producers. Those thus far 
with U are E. M. Asher and Al- 
bert De Mond. 

The new program provides only 
for pictures which have the ele- 
ments for class first run houses 
and three or four supers. Univer- 
sal will make no more program 
westerns and no more five-reelers. 

Contract players U is banking 
on to help put over the new pro- 
gram include Lupe Velez, under 
a five-year contract; John Boles; 
Lewis Ayres, who will be launched 
in ‘‘All Quiet on the Western 
Front,” and Jeanette Loff. 

Among the plays and books al- 
ready bought are ‘‘The Little 
Accident” by Floyd Dell; John 
Erskine’s ‘‘.Sincerity;’’ “East Is 
West;” G. B. Stern’s “For Hus- 
bands Only,” and “Outside the 
Law,” which Tod Browning will 
make. U also intends to remake 
“The Hunchback of Notre Pame.” 


WELLMAN’S W. B. FILM 


An ^ original story, “Maybe It’s 
Love,” featuring Joe E. Brown, 
James Hall and Evelyn Knapp, 
will go into production on the 
Warner lot this month. William 
Wellman will direct. 


RE-SIGN WYLER 


William Wyler’s contract with 
Universal has been 'renewed. Wyler 
is now directing “The Storm” for 
Universal. 


FRED BEERS PLANS 


Fred Beers, who recently re- 
signed as casting chief at M-G-M, 
has had offers from three other 
studios, but is not yet quite ready 
to terminate his vacation, taken to 
build up his health. He is under- 
stood to have an enterprise of his 
own which he may enter upon 
before making any connection. 


IS MAKEUP CHIEF 


Cecil Holland, veteran motion 
picture makeup artist, has been 
appointed in complete charge of 
the makeup department at War- 
ner Brothers. 


RE-SIGN CARTOONISTS 


Walter Lantz, animated car- 
toonist, and William Nolan, his 
assistant, have been re-signed to 
new contracts by Universal. The 
“Oswald” cartoons have been 
drawn for the past several years 
by Lentz and Nolan. 


WALES AT TIFFANY 


Ethel Wales has been cast by 
Tiffany for a role in “Under Mon- 
tana Skies.” 


LETTERS 

There are letters at the Los 
Angeles office of INSIDE 
FACTS for the following ; 

ATES, Ro«co« 

BIDMEAO Bros. 
DOWNING, Harry 
GILLETTE, Bobby 
JANOT, Maybelle 
MATHEWS, Madelyne 
MILLARD, S. S. 

PEDRO, Milly 
SHARLAND, Fred C. 


Hello, Gus Eysell. 

Hello, James Madison. 

Can I borrow any money on 
my head? 

I believe some mortgage 
companies loan on vacant 
property. 

* ♦ * 

Hello, Anti-Saloon League 

Hello, James Madison. 

Suppose the Literary Di- 
gest’s poll had favored the 
prohibition side, would you 
still call it “outrageous”? 

How did you come to ask 
such a question? 

* * * 

Hello, Jerome Kern 

Hello, James Madison. 

Who gives the best “gas” 
service? 

A professional lobbyist. 

* * * 

Hello, Olive Borden. 

Hello, James Madison. 

Why do Scotchmen seldom 
become Odd Fellows? 

They prefer FREE Ma- 
sonry. 

* « * 

Hello, Jean Hersholt. 

Hello, James Madison. 

Why do the “Shell” sta- 
tions get most of the prohibi- 
tion trade? 

Because they advertise “dry” 
gas. 

♦ ♦ + 

Hello, Lila Lee. 


Hello, James Madison. 

What’s the funniest news- 
paper ad you’ve seen lately? 

A “personal” in the Times, 
whidh read; — Fred, come home 
at once; mother has found 
work. 

♦ ♦ * 

Hello, Jack Dempsey. 

Hello, James Madison. 

What is the nature of the 
conversation you recently had 
with Colonel Lindbergh? 

We were discussing the best 
“landing” places. 

♦ * * 

Hello, Fatty Arbuckle. 

Hello, James Madison. 

What is your opinion of fat 
men ? 

We’re pretty popular, even 
if Pullman conductors give 
us a wide berth. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Hello, Noah Beery. 

Hello, James Madison. 

I understand that Peggy 
Joyce’s publicity agent is go- 
ing to have all her ex-hus- 
bands march down Broadway. 

I’d call that, “The Love Pa- 
rade.” 

* ♦ ♦ 

Hello, Lowell Sherman. 

Hello, James Madison. 

What is the correct etiquette 
when you make a social call 
on a business executive? 


ROBINSON AT U 


Edward G. Robinson, stage 
actor, has been signed by Uni- 
versal for the leading role in “Lit- 
tle Buddha,” an original story by 
Tod Browning, who will direct. 
The adaptation is being made by 
Tom Reed and Henry La Cossitt. 
It will go into production among 
the first on Universal’s new 1930- 
31 program. 

ANOTHER CHANGE 


Title of Tiffany’s “Song of the 
Rurales,” previously called “Down 
by the Rio Grande,” has been 
changed again to “Border Ro- 
mance.” 


WESTERN ACTOR ADDED 


Buddy Roosevelt has been added 
to the cast of M-G-M’s “Easy Go- 
ing,” William Haines’ new star- 
ring vehicle. 


HERBERT’S FIRST 


Hugh Herbert’s first directorial 
assignment under his new long- 
term contract with Radio Pictures 
is “He Knows Women,” featuring 
Lowell Sherman and Alice Joyce. 

GARBO STARTS SECOND 


Greta Garbo has started work 
on her second M-G-M talking 
picture, “Romance,” an adapta- 
tion of the stage play. Clarence 
Brown, who filmed Garbo’s “Anna 
Christie,” is directing. 


LEADS IN ORIGINAL 


James Hall and Evelyn Knapp, 
latter of the N. Y. stage, have 
been signed by Warners for the 
leading roles in “Precious Little 
Thing,” an original. William Holden 
is in the supporting cast. 


Eddy Peabody 


IS TO 


Open at the 
FOX, San Francisco 
April 11th 

With a New Bag of Banjoys 

After a Short Vacation on the Peabody Rancho 

Never Better Never Peppier 

and as 

ORIGINAL AS EVER 

(Exclusive Management Mrs. Eddie Peabody) 



SATURDAY, APRIL S, 1930 


INSIDE FACTS OF STAGE AND SCREEN 


PAGE SEVEN 


Harold J. Bock 

Manager 

PHONE DOUGLAS 2213 


SAN FRANCISCO 


KRESS BLDG. 
935 Market SL, 

Office Suite 504 


BEACHES AND PARKS TAKE 
TOLL OF PICnjRE GROSSES 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— ■ 
Beaches and parks continued to 
profit by the summer weather that 
has set in, leaving picture houses 
in the lurch. Fox, with Gaynor 
and Farrell in "High Society 
Blues,” Fanchon and Marco’s 
"Skirts Idea” and Walt Roesner 
conducting the concert orchestra 
did $45,000 on the week. Vilma 


mmm eiifiT 

ON COLOMBm SOOVl! 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
With casting virtually completed 
rehearsals are due to get under 
way this week for "Hi There,” the 
Paul Bissinger production which 
will open at Erlanger’s Columbia 
on May 12. 

Heading the cast will be Ken 
Murray, Odette Myrtil, Lester 
Vail, Frank Beaston, Teddy Wal- 
ters, Helen Charleston and brother, 
Billy Griffith, Neal Spaulding, 
Griff Williams and Paul Speegle. 
Murray is due to arrive here next 
week on the RKO circuit and will 
leave that chain for the local pro- 
duction. 

Alexander Leftwich, who did 
"The Little Show” in New York, 
is directing "Hi There.” Carlton 
Kelsey and his orchestra will be 
in the show, and dances will be 
staged by A1 Siegel, who is as- 
sistant to Sammy Lee on the 
M-G-M lot. Settings and costumes 
are being designed by Harold 
Helvenston, dramatic director of 
Stanford University. 

Music of the show is being done 
by eight men, among them being 
Anson Weeks, orchestra leader at 
the Hotel Mark Hopkins here, and 
Thomas Hamilton Breeze; Jack 
Wiggin and Gregory Williamson; 
Richard Myers and Eddie Eliscu; 
and Joe Meyers and Griffin Wil- 
liams. 

Young Bissinger, producer of 
the show, is a San Francisco man, 
graduate of Stanford University 
and son of a wealthy hide mer- 
chant. 


LEAVES ROOF GARDEN 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
Frank Martinelli has left Gus 
Oliva’s Roof Garden Cafe, where 
he acted as manager for several 
years. Martinelli instituted numer- 
ous of his ideas in the management 
and decoration of the popular night 
spot. It is reported that he is 
seeking and will open a dine-and- 
dance emporium of his own within 
the next 30 days. 


LOBBY CONTEST 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
Paramount Theatre now has a lob- 
by entertainment contest, sched- 
uled to close April 14. Winners 
will appear in the lobby daily for 
two weeks, with Publix officials 
having an option to send them on 
tour if they so desire. 


SWEEZ PASSES THROUGH 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
Bert Sweez of the Pioneer Print- 
ing Co., Seattle, theatrical printers, 
was here this week en route to 
Los Angeles for a vacation.- 


Banky in "A Lady To Love” is 
current. 

M-G-M’s “Bishop Murder Case” 
okay but not up to snuff for 
Loew’s Warfield, which, together 
with C. Sharpe-Minor at the or- 
gan and Peter Paul Lyons’ or- 
chestra did $20,000. 

Ruth Chatterton in “Sarah and 
Son” (Paramount) at Publix’s 
Paramount grossed $19,000. Har- 
old Ramsay at the organ and Don 
George conducting the orchestra, 
aided. Buddy Rogers in “Young 
Eagles” now in. St. Francis with 
fourth and final stanza of Par’s 
“Vagabond King” did $9000. Fan- 
nie Brice in U. A.’s “Be Yourself” 
holds the screen now. California, 
with second and last week of 
Harry Richman in “Puttin’ on the 
Ritz” (U. A.) did $14,000. “Light 
of the W’estern Skies” (Par) cur- 
rent). 

Orpheum opened Columbia’s 
“Ladies of Leisure” to the tune 
of $11,500, low but better than 
some previous flickers. Tommy 
Boyd’s orchestra and Buss Mc- 
Clelland at the organ helped. 

Ackerman and Harris’ Casino 
dropped to $9500 on Fox’s “Seven 
Faces” with Paul Muni. Picture 
was good but over Casino custom- 
ers' heads. A stage show com- 
pleted the bill. “Hideout” holds 
the screen this week. 


CELEBRATE LONG STAY 
OF KING AT OAKLAND 


OAKLAND, April _ 3. — With 
Hermie King entering his seventy- 
fifth week as master-of-ceremonies 
at the Fox-Oakland, Frank R. 
Newman, manager, arranged a 
“Hermie King Week” for the 
house, plastering the entire city 
with publicity on the event. 

King opened the house 75 weeks 
ago and since that time has been 
highly popular with local show- 
goers. The Fox-Oakland, playing 
Fancho'n and Marco “Ideas” and 
first-run pictures, does probably 
the best business of the city. 


W. B. THEATRE DOUBTFUL 


OAKLAND, April 3. — Current 
reports indicate that the deal for 
a proposed Warner Bros, theatre 
in this city has fallen through, as 
city hall records show no trans- 
feral of property that was an- 
nounced as a site for the house. 
Publix theatres, however, are forg- 
ing ahead in their plans for a de 
luxe house which will bring the 
list of first run houses up to five. 


IS W. V. E. REP 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
Phil Frease has been named rep- 
resentative for the entertainment 
department of R-K-O’s Western 
Vaude Exchange. He begins 
May 1. 


HAYAKAWA SAILS 

SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
Sessue Hayakawa, Japenese film 
player, sailed from here this week 
for his native Japan on his first 
trip home in eight years. He is 
preparing to establish a picture 
production company there. 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
Louvre Cafe has discontinued its 
entertainment, letting go Chuck 
Thode and Jimmy Curry, who pi- 
anoed and sang during the dinner 
hour. 


LIME TRIO 

“THE GOLLYWOG” 

Direction: Weber-Simon Agency 


Market St. 
Gleanings 

SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— A 
checkup on recording sales in San 
Francisco reveals that there are 

more Johnny Marvin records pack- 
aged and passed over the counter 
than any other one vocal disc. 

In the orchestra group Leo Reis- 
man and Guy Lombardo run about 
neck-and-neck for sales values. 

^ ^ Hi 

Back in 1895 the original Or- 
pheum on O’Farrell street sold 
beer at 10 cents a stein during per- 
formances. This week, on the 

opening of “Ladies of Leisure,” 
the house instituted a Parisian 
sidewalk cafe idea and gave the 
foaming stuff to passers-by. 

♦ ♦ * 

We like the clever idea Bob Har- 
vey occasionally uses in his Fox- 
West Coast ads. He utilizes the 
outstanding comic strip characters 
each week and has them voice their 
favorable opinion on the Fox, War- 
field and El Cap operas. It’s 
catchy and effective. 

* m 

Spotlights 

Henry Pincus, in his new car, 
combing the town for dimes on a 
Sunday . . . Fred Hamlin worried 
about walking down the Rialto in 
gt>lf knickers and black-and-white 
shoes . . . Harry Bush even plug- 
.ging “Springtime in the Rockies” 
in the 1300 block on Eddy . . . 
Clarence Foster, the sax and clari- 
net tooter, now behind the desk of 
the Hotel Governor . . . this kol- 
yumist ham-and-egging in the 

morning with William Don . . . 

Walter Beban still with a bum 
foot . . . the golfer’s fate . . . 
Larry Yoell with a song about His 
Old Gal . . . the newest likker in 
this town causes blisters all over 
the body . . . good stuff . . . 

must be just off the boat . . . 

scraped off . . . which may not be 
funny, but just look at the space it 
uses. 


EDITH LOSES SUIT 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
As her own attorney she’s a good 
actress, Edith Ransome decided 
this week when she assumed the 
role of a Portia in and lost her 
suit for $100,000 damages against 
Richard "Tucker in Judge Roche’s 
Superior Court. Just because she 
lost one suit isn’t going to stop 
the former star of “White Cargo,” 
for she has two more up her sleeve, 
the first for $150,000 damages 
against Equity and the other a 
default judgment for $20,000 
against Lionel Samuels, theatre 
manager. 


GETS “GHOST” PLAY 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
Pacific Coast rights to “The Blue 
Ghost.” mystery play by Bernard 
McOwen and John P. Reiwerts, 
have been purchased by Henry 
Duffy who opens it at his Presi- 
dent here April 6. McOwen, au- 
thor of “The Skull,” will play the 
leading role, with Earl Lee, Lulu 
Hubbard and Paul McGrath also 
in the cast. 


FIRE IN FOX HOUSE 

VALLEJO, April 3. — Damage 
estimated at $30,000 was do'ne to 
the $70,000 Fox Vallejo by fire 
which broke out in the loges after 
the theatre had closed Thursday 
night. A. M. Bowles, Fox West 
Coast division head, Charles Thall 
and W. H. Lollier flew up from 
San Francisco the following day 
to look over the damaged house. 


HARRY WEBB ILL 

SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
Harry Webb on the R-K-O Gold- 
en (Jate bill, was forced out of 
the show last half of the week by 
illness. 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
After a week of four shows daily, 
Ackerman and Harris are reverting 
to a three-a-day policy at their 
Casino. 


FOIIK NEW LEGIT SHOWS HAVE 
OPENINGS IN CURHENT WEEK 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
The Aveek just beginning founds 
four new legit shows _ opening, 
with other vehicles running at an 
average pace. Heat and Lent com- 
bined to take their toll. 

Geary opened with the Ring 
Lardner comedy, “June Moon,” 
playing to capacity on its first 
night and holding up well since. 
Dailies were kind to the show 
and it has been getting good 
word-of-mouth publicity to help 
hold it up. “Rope’s End” came 
into the Curran for a short run 
and opened okay. 

Erlanger’s Columbia had Madge 
Kennedy returning for one week, 
this time to do “Paris Bound,” 
which has been drawing pretty 
good business. Henry Duffy 
opened with Violet Heming in “Let 
Ps Be Gay” at his Alcazar and 
it’s doing nicely. 

Previous week found _ legit at a 
low ebb. Fay Marbe in her one 
\TOman revue at the Curran 
grossed a low $6000 for her sole 
week. House said to be out of 
the red even on this. 

Frank Craven in “Salt Water” 
closed at Duffy’s President with 
a gross of $4000 while Mary Bo- 
land in “Ladies of the Jury” 
bowed out of Duffy’s Alcazar with 


JO MENDEL IS LESSEE 
OF COTTAGE AT BEACH 


$4500 to its credit. In Oakland 
Duffy’s Dufwin did $4000 on “The 
Old Homestead.” “Journey’s End” 
road-showed into Duffy’s Fulton 
for a week and did $8200; a good 
intake. 

Erlanger's Columbia, with Sir 
Philip Ben Greet in a week of 
Shakespearean rep took in $10,000. 

msWIi 

FOR LUTE SHOWS 


OAKLAND. April 3.— Frank R. 
Newman has inaugurated a policy 
of Saturday midnight shows at 
the Fox Oakland, the first of which 
got under way to good returns 
this week. 

Oakland has been hampered in 
its night life by lack of transpor- 
tation after 1 a. m. By a tieup 
with bus and taxi companies New- 
man secured good transportation 
facilities for his customers with 
the result that they turned out in 
large numbers to see Hermie King. 
Fanohon and Marco’s “Marble 
Idea,” six local radio acts and 
Fox’s “Such Men Are Dangerous.” 


FRED HAMLIN ARRIVES 
FOR NEW PUBLIX DUTY 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— Jo 
Mendel has taken a 10-year lease 
on the former Canary Cottage and 
will open it May 1 with a big $5 
first night as Jo Mendel’s Cafe-at- 
the-Beach. 

Mendel has spent about $25,000 
in redecorating and remodeling the 
place, and when he opens will have 
one of the classiest night spots of 
San Francisco. 

He will have a 10-piece band, a 
singer and a dancer. Maxine al- 
ready has been signed for the 
dance job. On the opening night 
— a formal affair — Max Dolin will 
appear as guest star and will con- 
tribute several violin solos. In ad- 
dition to the formal opening night 
Mendel will have an informal 
evening on May 2. 

Place will feature a $1.50 dinner 
with a 50-cent couvert. 

For five years Mendel was or- 
chestra leader at the Lido, North 
Beach cafe, where he built up a 
big local following. 


HO ON U. S. ’VISIT 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
On his first trip to the mainland, 
Joseph W. Ho, for the past nine 
years head of the art depart^nent 
of the Consolidated Amusement 
Co. of Honolulu, arrived here this 
week to begin a three months’ stay 
in the states. 


CROOK BACK 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
L. R. Crook, head of National 
Theatres, has returned from a two- 
weeks’ trip to Los Angeles and 
Yosemite Park. Local offices of 
National Theatres in the Golden 
Gate Building, have been com- 
pletely remodelled and redecorated. 


TO DO JOB 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
The J. L. Stewart Co. probably 
will get the contract for approxi- 
mately $45,000 worth of improve- 
ments on the Civic Auditorium, 
city fathers decided at a meeting 
this week. 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
Appointed to the newly created 
post of division advertising man- 
ager of Publix Theatres, Fred 
Hamlin arrived here this week to 
take up his new duties. He will 
travel up and down the coast vis- 
iting the various houses of the. 
Publix chain, conferring with man- 
agers on their advertising, pub- 
licity and exploitaion. 

Hamlin was formerly with First 
National studios and prior to that 
with the A. H. Woods Produc- 
tions. 


G. G. ANNIVERSARY 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
R-K-O Golden Gate is this week 
celebrating its eighth anniversary. 
House opened in 1922 as a Junior 
Orpheum theatre and, with recent 
reorganizations of the circuit, is 
now the only vaudeville theatre in 
San Francisco. 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
The De Celiletos, ballroom dance 
team, are appearing at the Hotel 
St. Francis with the Laughner- 
Harris Band. 


“A LITTLE SMILE” 

Words and Music by 

GEO- B. L. BRAUN 
(A Fox Trot Sensation) 
CONCORD PUBLISHING Ca 

1179 Market St. San Francisco 


Artistic Scenic Advertising 
Curtains 

By Far the Beat in America 
CURTAIN PRIVILEGES 
BOUGHT FOR CASH 
OR SCENERY 

Chas. F. Thompson 
Scenic Co. 

1215 Bates Avenue 
Phone OLympia 2914 
Hollywood, Calif. 


HOTEL GOVERNOR 

TURK AT JONES 

SAN FRANCISCO 

THE HOME OF ALL THEATRICAL PEOPLE 
PLAYING SAN FRANCISCO 
SPECIAL RATES TO PROFESSIONALS 
JACK WOLFENDEN, Prop. BERT HENDREN, Aaat. 


Mgr. 


SCENERY BY MARTIN STUDIOS 

HOLLYWOOD. CALIFORNIA 



PAGE EIGHT 


INSIDE FACTS OF STAGE AND SCREEN 


SATURDAY, APRIL 5, 1930 


REVIEWS 

COMMENT 


RADIOLA^VD 

By FRED YEATES 


CHATTER 

NEWS 


3 


Pickups & 
Viewpoint 

By FRED YEATES 

Few publicity men have a sense 
of humor, and that perhaps is yvhy 
they are publicity men. But Dicky 
Creedon of KHJ turns out some 
classic copy regularly and as a 
result many newspaper columnists 
are acquiring reputations as joke- 
sters as they are not above lift- 
ing’ it bodily. Here is Dicky’s 
latest: 

“There is a psuedo-scientific 
talk of a new race being de- 
veloped in Southern California. 
One characteristic of this present 
crop of super-children is that they 
all play harmonicas — and over 
KHJ. Twenty-eight thousand chil- 
dren from 35 Los Angeles public 
.schools have been formed into 
groups by Charles McRay, su- 
pervisor of harmonica bands, and 
most of them have been heard 
over KHJ on Friday afternoons. 
Perhaps it is the deep chests, 
bulging eyes and puffed out cheeks 
of this mouth-organing generation 
which has made science scratch its 
bald but noble bean. Perhaps the 
time will come when the civilized 
world will agree to sink its navies 
if the Unfted States will drown 
its harmonica players.’’ 

* * * 

A “girl reporter” broadcasts 
news items over KMTR. Let’s 
hope she has an indulgent city 
editor. 

« * * 

Bernice Foley has been put in 
charge of publicity for KMPC. 
Beverly Hills. One look at her 
and we pray for television to 
hurry; KMPC would make the 
Big Time at one shot. 

* * * 

Will Rogers is reported to have 
drawn down over $7500 for his 
appearance over KFI for the NBC 
last Sunday. Well, that trade 
paper must have been nearly right 
when it declared Los Angeles 
radio performers were saps who 
worked for nothing. 

* * ♦ 

The Ritz Trio are due to crash 
the air in these parts very shortly. 
They will likely be a riot as there 
is nothing quite like them on any 
local program. Male harmonizers 
whose repertoire includes comedy, 
novelty and straight numbers, 
their record is one of unfailing 
success during the four years they 
have been together on both stage 
and radio. The personnel: Rudy 
Wintner, Ray Angwin and Dale 
Jackson. 

» * * 

Marillah Olney, director of dra- 
matics at KTM, has had pub- 
licity added to her duties and we 
are anxiously awaiting the first 
script. 

* * ♦ 

KFI is the latest station to go 
for a variety hour. Tuesday night 
is the time, and the first reaction 
is a complaint about lack of orig- 
inality. We were unable to hear 
it. but we heard a loud squawk 
that artists on it were copping 
off material used on the Blue 
Monday Jamboree, Tsk, tsk! 

* * * 

The technician sent by KFI to 
handle the remote control from 
Max Fisher’s cafe now has to 
check his hat and coat at the door. 
It was first his habit to stride 

through the cafe toward his equip- 
ment booth without removing them 
and several cases of nervous pros- 
tration developed the fact that cus- 
tomers didn’t know whether he 
was a prohibition officer or a boot- 
legger. A head waiter imposed the 
new rule in the cause of ru- 
manity. 


NICHOLS GOES SOUTH 


SEATTLE, April 3.— Bob Nich- 
ols, prominent local radio announ- 
cer, left here this week for an ex- 
tensive trip to California, where he 
expects to locate. He was singer 
and announcer at KOMO and chief 
announcer at the now defunct 
American Broadcasting Company 
for two years. 


JOINS STATION 
SEATTLE, April 3. — S t e v e n 
Galer has joined the staff of Sta- 
tion KVI in the capacity of bari- 
tone soloist and announcer. The 
realignment of KVTs announcing 
staff finds Dick Rickard now chief 
announcer there. 


M. P. BKQUE 
H KMPC SCHEDDIE 


KMPC, Beverly Hills, is to fea- 
ture a travesty on interviewing 
casting directors for talking pic- 
tures on Saturday night, April 5, 
at 9:15. The skit is titled “Us 
Men” and features little Leon 
Janney of “Our Gang” fame, Flor- 
ence Stone and Jack Richardson. 

Florence Stone will be remem- 
bered as having opened the Phil- 
harmonic Auditorium and as hav- 
ing starred in sitock at the old 
Morosco Theatre. She has just re- 
turned from two years with the 
Shuberts in New York. 

Jack Richardson will be casting 
director in the skit. He has had 
heavy roles in “Leatherneck,” 
“Sailor’s Holiday” and other talkies 
and knows his c. d.’s. 

cmuicmli IT 

Di E STITIOII 


Ted White has been added to 
the announcing and entertaining 
staff of KHJ. He is a former 
newspaperman and night club per- 
former. 

Harry Johnson, vaude per- 
former, has been signed by KHJ 
for a regular morning program of 
music and patter. 

Roy Ringwald is to direct the 
vocal ensemble at the local Don 
Lee station. 

Lindsay MacHarrie, chief an- 
nouncer, has been made produc- 
tion manager, and Leigh Harline 
has become program manager. 
Both have been at KHJ for some 
time. 

DIXOf Pin ON 
AIR FOR 9 YEARS 


SEATTLE, April 3. — Sydney 
Dixon, one of the coast’s pioneer 
radio artists, has established an 
enviable reputation with both the 
fans and the profession since 
coming here nine years ago. He 
has appeared over every radio sta- 
tion of any prominence on the 
Pacific Coast, prior to which he 
toured the Orpheum Circuit do- 
ing a single. 

Forty- two weeks at Loew’s 
Capitol Theatre, New York City, 
and a seven-month tour of the 
Famous Players-Canadian Circuit 
preceded Dixon’s advent into the 
local radio field. 

Since first coming to Seattle, 
Dixon has absented himself for 
eighteen months, during which 
time he served as the leading 
tenor of the Pacific Coast NBC 
System. KFI, KPO and KGW 
are listed among the larger sta- 
tions at which Dixon was fea- 
tured. 

Dixon, currently featured over 
the Northwest Broadcasting Sys- 
tem’s networkthrough the local 
outlet, KJR, has built a heavy 
following for himself. He varies 
his programs from operatic clas- 
sics to popular ballad numbers. 

Studio Execs 
Asked for Help 
On Debating 


The subject of radio advertis- 
ing is now occupying the serious 
attention of high school and col- 
lege students, and debating clubs 
all over the country are driving 
studio executives near to hysteria 
in their incessant queries for de- 
tailed information “fer an’ agin” 
the proposition. 

The broadcast execs are taking 
encouragement from the thought 
that the boys may help them to 
solve some of the problems that 
have been bothering them since 
the beginning of radio broadcast- 
ing. 


Program Reviews 
Of Air Offerings 


CROSS-SECTIONING 
RADIOLAND 
THUMBNAIL REVIEWS 

LOS ANGELES 
(Reviewed March 30) 

Sabbath twilight on the Califor- 
nia air. Pipe a Los Angelos 
vesper. 

5:55 p.m.— KECA. “. . . I just 
adore talking about Freud!” A fe- 
male gusher coming in strong. 

6:00 p.m. — KGER. Phonograph 
records, symphonic selections. 

6:02 p.m. — Doc Shuler’s radio. 
A lady singing hymns. Some of 
the regular radio artists might well 
simulate her earnestness. 

6:05 p.m. — KFOX. Harmony 
Girls singing “Just You, Just Me.” 
This sounded like a hymn, too. 

6 "07 p. m. — KGFJ. Just another 
organ grinding out pops. 

6:15 p.m. — KFI. Atwater Kent 
hour via NBC from New York. 
Presenting Sigrid Onegin, operatic 
mezzo, and orchestra. Always a 
big shot on this hour, and they 
seem to know how to broadcast 
them. 

6:50 p. m. — KMTR. “Just You, 
Just Me,” piano and fiddle playing 
to each other. 

6:55 p.m. — KELW. Burbank 
Methodist Church, announcing re- 
ceipt of a dozen or two requests, 
all answered by a tenor singing “I 
Came to the Garden Alone.” 

7:00 p.m. — KHJ. Majestic hour 
(CBS) just concluding, followed 
by Royal Typewriter hour from 
New York, featuring Jesse Craw- 
ford at the organ in light classic 
and pop medleys. 

7:10 p.m.— KFWB. “Every 
Cloud Must Have a Silver Lining,” 
lady’s voice and piano; followed by 
Hollywood Revelers Orchestra in 
“Broken Dreams.” 

7:15 p.m.— KNX. “The practical 
purpose served by the Bible . . .” 
A voice, but male or female we 
dunno. 

7:20 p.m. — KFSG. “A-a-a-m-e-n ! 
Let us sing ‘Hail to Thee, O An- 
gelus Temple!’ Say Allelulia!” 
They clapped their hands and sang 
like everything. This is Aimee’s 
radio. 

Yeates. 


CROSS-SECTIONING 
RADIOLAND 
THUMBNAIL REVIEWS 

SAN FRANCISCO 
(Reviewed March 26) 

KFWM, Oakland (5:45 p. m.) — 
Highlighted by Dr. Forrester’s 
lengthy blasts re his treatments; 
has determination to warble, giv- 
ing rise to the supposition that he 
is a much better medico than a 
singer. Nice pop voice displayed 
by Beth Chase; Harriette Pool 
okay in organ number; Bob Trav- 
ers weakly tenoring a ballad; 
Charley Pacheco in piano number. 

KYA (8:10 p. m.) — The 1640 
Boys, Tommy Munroe and Bob 
Allen in an excellent program. 
Munroe displaying highly pleasing 
voice and Allen playing plentj; of 
piano. Auto plugs. Jack Lee sing- 
ing, accompanying himself on gui- 
tar; George Bowers hitting high 
notes in “Love Me.” Larry Smith 
announcing. Very good program 
all the way through. 

KRE, Berkeley (8;35 p. m.) — 
Recordings. Echo. Announcer sud- 
denly remembers things he forgot 
in previous announcements. 

KGGC (8:38 p. m.) — Request 
program of accordion numbers by 
Johnny Tivio alternating with re- 
cordings. Heigh ho. 

KFWI (8:50 p. m.) — Woman 
giving educational talk on invest- 
ment. Starting disclosure that she 
was born in Visalia and that she 
and announcer are old friends but 
didn’t remember. Announcer had 
nice voice, however. 

^ KQW, San Jose (9 p._ m.) — Re- 
ligious ranter biasing into mike 
. . . Hallelujah, brother ... In 
1914 the Lord saved my soul . . . 
Come and have your’s saved . . . 
Hallelujah . . . Taking cracks at 
other denominations; a very bad 
policy for any station to permit. 

KLX, Oakland (9:07 p. m.)— 
Man reviewing books, punctuating 
each phrase with a cough in the 
mike, minus apologies. Smacking 
of lips as if drinking beer. 

KGO (9:17 p. m.--Max Dolin 
in violin solos revealing excellent 


■technique and ability. Schubert’s 
“Cradle Song” and a Kreisler num- 
ber. Beautiful. Piano accompani- 
ment by Arthur Schwarzman. 

KPO (9:24 p. m. — Auto plug. 
Chain program with Maurine Dyer 
singing the solemn “Romance” 
with piano background. Excellent 
coneert orchestra. 

KFRC (9:30 p. m.) — Columbia 
chain program with nicely bal- 
anced popular music . . .“Blue Is 
the Night,” vocally effective; 
“Neapolitan Nights,” good orches- 
tral number. Lengthy finance com- 
pany plug. “Lonely Troubadour.” 
Rather flowery continuity. 

KTAB (9:45 p. m.) — Pepper 
Box hour. Male quartette singing 
“River S h a n n o n.” Two-minute 
sketchy sketch about corn muffins. 
Colorless male voice accompany- 
ing self on guitar and doing song 
about being hungry. Accordions. 
Orchestra with piano subdued 
more than it should be. 

Bock. 


R-K-0 SPOTLIGHT 

KPO, SAN FRANCISCO 
Rebroadcast by KOMO, Seattle 
(Reviewed March 29) 

Deviating from a general policy 
of pop programs the RKO Spot- 
light Revue featured Adele Verne, 
vaude headliner, at the piano and 
Claude Sweeten, Golden Gate 
house leader, on the violin in some 
classics. 

The numbers came over the re- 
broadcast excellently. Miss Verne’s 
own composition “Inspiration” 
proved to be a heavy classic, 
played artistically and altogether 
a nifty offering. 

An arrangement of the Ceasar 
Franck symphony was played as 
a duet, the piano work leaving 
nothing to be desired and the 
double stopping and staccato of 
the violin standing out. 

_ The third number was Bach’s 
air for the G string, showing both 
artists at their best and executed 
for best results over the mike. 

Jean. 


BRIDGE HOUR— KYA 

SAN FRANCISCO 

This is an informal hour of 
general entertainment m. c.’d by 
Dud Williamson with an assisting 
group of five artists. Program re- 
viewed was one of the best Bridge 
Hours yet. 

Started with Tom Smith guitar- 
ing, Freddie Heward fiddling and 
Virginia Smith pianoing “Sitting 
On a Doorstep,” with Williamson 
and Smith doing a vocal harmony 
chorus. Marv Atkinson, soprano, 
sang “Sarita.” 

Williamson vocalized “Happy 
Days.” probably his best number. 
Displayed nice delivery and pleas- 
ing voice. Okay on the an- 
nouncing, too, but wants to watch 
the wisecracks; they come a little 
fast and often for this type of 
program. 

Virginia Spencer offered a piano 
solo “Moanin’ Low” with lots of 
modern and futuristic twists. Tom 
Smith singing ‘‘Waitin’ For the 
Train” showed nice tone quality in 
voice and good guitar accompani- 
ment. Helen Stone in trick vocal 
version of “Ain’t She Sweet” 
scored. 

A difficult violin solo “Fiddlin’ 
the Fiddle” by Freddie Heward 
was outstanding. Works on style 
of Joe Venuti and plenty hot. Has 
nifty harmony and counter mel- 
odies on his vocal accompani- 
ments. Mary Atkinson balladed 
‘‘Come Back To Me” nicely. Wil- 
liamson in “Watching My Dreams 
Go_ By” was good and then Vir- 
ginia Spencer followed with “Doo 
Doo Doo” in characteristic style. 
Nice harmony in Mary Atkinson, 
Helen Stone and Virginia Spencer 
doing “In My Dreams.” 

Helen Stone’s reception in the 
bag when she did “Gee, But I’m 
Blue” in classy fashion. Instru- 
mental tricfc — Spencer, Heward and 
Stone— did “Lover, Come Back To 
Me,” a good tune, but could have 
been shortened by one chorus. 
Williamson in “Hello Baby,” 
Mary Atkinson doing “Sweet- 
hearts” and Tom Smith and Fred- 
die Heward doing “Go To Sleep, 
My Baby” with Smith yodeling, 
closed the program. Hal. 

(Continued on Page 9) 



SEATTLE, April 3.— KOMO 
has introduced a new idea in chil- 
dren’s radio entertainment with the 
initial broadcast of the “Garden 
Patch Lady” program. 

Malcom E. Moran, motion pic- 
ture writer and author of Douglas 
McLean’s “The Carnation Kid,” 
has written a running story for 
these programs that has been tran- 
scribed to dramatic dialogue by 
Dorothy Cleland. 

“The Garden Patch Lady” pro- 
gram carries plenty of exciting en- 
tertainment .for the youngsters. A 
group of educational features will 
be interwoven with the unfurling 
of the story, KOMO officials de- 
clare. Among these will be talks 
by Gertrude Andrus from the chil- 
dren’s book department of Fred- 
erick and Nelson, local depart- 
ment store. Miss Andrus will in- 
terpolate book reviews on late 
children’s novels and histories. 
Kathryn Compton of the Cornish 
School will relate, from time to 
time, according to the schedule, ep- 
isodes from the lives of famous 
musical composers and render some 
of their compositions. 

George Godfrey, stage and radio 
actor, is directing the “Garden 
Patch” program, which goes out 
over KOMO daily except Saturday 
and Sunday. 

CLIFFOn KMEK 
PKIME MDIO FIV 


SEATTLE, April 3. — A pupil 
of his father, Clifford Kantner, 
well-known local teacher of voice 
culture, Jean Kantner, currently 
featured baritone soloist over KJR, 
possesses a wide range to his 
voice that, coupled with its pleas- 
ing qualities, makes him one of 
the prime radio favorites of this 
town. 

Jean Kantner first gained promi- 
nence here when, in 1927, he was 
chosen winner of the musical con- 
test sponsored by the Federated 
Women Clubs of Seattle. 

His programs include the popu- 
lar ballads, standard classics and 
operatic excerpts, with plenty of 
personality injected into his work. 


ANTHONYS BACK 


Earle C. and Mrs. Anthony are 
back from their Honolulu jaunt. 
They report that on account of 
excellent weather conditions very 
little broadcasting was done from 
the steamer-side. 


Over the Air From KYA 
SAN FRANCISCO 
Comes the Voice of 

Greta Gahler 


AliWATS AltXIOUS TO PLEASE 

George Nickson 

TENOR SOLOIST 
KYA - SAN FRANCISCO 


TUNE IN ON 
DUD 

WILLIAMSON 

masteb of ceremonies 

and STAFF ARTIST 
KYA SAN FRANCISCO 


RADIO’S 

PERSONALITY GIRL 

JEANE COWAN 

Dally At 

KFWB 


DOBY & LOU 

COMEDY HARMONY 
Per. Address: INSIDE FACTS 
SAN FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, APRIL 5, 1930 


INSIDE FACTS OF STAGE AND SCREEN 


PAGE NINS 


Special Air 
Program Given 
For Peabodys 


The sixth anniversary of the 
marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Eddie 
Peabody was made the subject of 
a special broadcast over KMTR, 
Thursday morning, March 27. Ed- 
die and his wife were vacationing 
at the Peabody Rancho at River- 
side, Calif., and the station kept 
in touch with them by telephone, 
broadcasting to the public just 
what they were doing and furnish- 
ing appropriate atmospheric mu- 
sic, as for instance, while dinner 
was being served on the patio, 
Spanish music was played, and 
while they were playing golf the 
theme was “I’m Walking Around 
in a Dream.” 

The famous banjoist-m. c. is 
slated to open at the Fox, San 
Francisco, on April 11. 

HER FIMRS 
ARE FAR Ai lEAR 


SEATTLE, April 3.— What is 
believed to be a world record for 
diversity of fan mail for any radio 
artist is claimed by Betty Shilton, 
organist at Fox’s Fifth Avenue 
Theatre here, who broadcasts 
nightly over KOMO by remote 
control from the theatre. 

Included in Betty’s recent re- 
ceipt of requests was a caiblegram 
from the ice-bound steamer Nanuk, 
fur-trading ’way up on the rim of 
the Arctic Circle. The crew of 
the ship pick up Betty’s program 
regularly and, the other day, sent 
down the wire message for a real 
hot number. Picking out some- 
thing appropriate for a bunch of 
lads up in the frozen north Betty 
played “Chant of the Jungle.” 

A few days after the northern 
request. Miss Shilton was sur- 
prised to receive a communica- 
tion from Cuba. It seems that the 
lad making the request couldn’t 
write English, so he went to a 
notary public, who wasn’t much 
better even if he did have the 
legal seals and all, who drew up 
the document in regulation of- 
ficial form, requesting, to wit: 
Party of the first part requests of 
party of the second part, etc., etc., 
etc., to execute, render, play, 
broadcast, etc., etc., etc., “Estrel- 
lita.” The contract was fulfilled. 

The pay-off of recent letters 
came from a couple of bachelors 
in the Arctic Circle who wanted 
an appropriate tune. The lads have 
been frozen in for several months 
with a load of beautiful seal and 
fox pelts that would bring envy 
to any miss, so Betty just turned 
around and played for them Men- 
delssohn’s “Wedding March” and 
“Hotter ’n Hot” from Fox’s 
Movietone Follies, and “Turn on 
the Heat” from “Sunnyside Up.” 

8™ MT is 

popyuli m KOI 


SEATTLE, April 3.— One of the 
most well-liked radio announcers 
in these parts is Stan Spiegle, 
currently holding forth at the 
microphone at KOMO. 

Stan holds down _ the “early 
bird” and daytime shift, handling 
some of the more prominent of 
the programs emanating from this 
station during these periods. Stan’s 
voice mikes well, and he bids fair 
to get somewhere. 

In addition to his capabilities as 
an announcer, Spiegle is well 
versed in writing continuity and 
chasing studio publicity, having 
had extensive experience in both 
these fields while associate director 
for the American Broadcasting 
Company. 


— RADIO ARTISTS — 

Here’s a New Tune for You! 

“AM I THE ONLY ONE 
FOR YOU” 

A Tuneful Fox-Trot Song 
Adv. Song Copies Free 
Stamps Appreciated 

MANAOIS MUSIC PUB. 

1619 J. St, San Diego, Calif< 


AOBOn PHIS OVER 
BI6 PHILCO PLOCS 


SEATTLE, April 3.— H. C. Ab- 
bott. regional factory sales rep- 
resentative for the Philco Radio 
people, has been spending consid- 
erable time in this territory un- 
corking one of the most show- 
manlike campaigns for his products 
the natives have ever seen. _ 

Starting his efforts by tying in 
with the Publix houses, for whom 
he purchased full page spreads, 
plugging his radio and the current 
theatre attraction, in return for 
which the showshop laid out a 
display of Philcos in the lobby, 
Abbott has proceeded rapidly with 
his whirlwind plan, and, obviously 
getting plenty of results. One of 
the gags was to snipe in the the- 
atre 24-sheets with the phrase, 
“Paramount on the screen — Phil- 
co on the air.” 

The pay-off of Abbott’s exploita- 
tion campaign came here early in 
the week when he launched his 
“trade-in” campaign. Time vvas 
purchased on every radio station 
in the northwest, as well as space 
in every daily of prominence, ad- 
vising the public that Philco deal- 
ers would take the old radio in 
trade, giving them the top allow- 
ance and, in turn, donating the 
used radios, after reconditioning 
them, to invalids, shut-ins, insti- 
tutions and poor folks absolutely 
free. For this campaign, Abbott 
hired Arthur Clausen and his Or- 
chestra from Publix’s Paramount 
Theatre. Clausen and his boys 
opened the drive with a whirlwind 
program that went out over KVI, 
local outlet of the OBS. 

Already Abbott’s campaign is 
reported as showing great results. 
Every -dealer in the territory is 
tied in on the stunt, and it looks 
like a tough season for the oppo- 
sition. 

San Francisco 
Radio Notes 

SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
The third Pacific Coast anniver- 

sary of National Broadcasting Co. 
will be celebrated this Saturday 
night when an anniversary fete is 
on the cards. About a hundred 
local aerial artists will take part in 
a program at the Community The- 
atre and for which a thousand in- 
vitations have been extended. It 
will be broadcast over KGO at 

10:15. 

* * ♦ 

In the belief that the soothing 
strains of music will aid their 

cows in giving more and better 
milk, several Stockton dairymen 
have installed a radio loud speak- 
er in their dairy barns. The speak- 
er is said to have a device that 
will automatically shut off harmony 
teams that turn sour on the high 
notes. 

* * * 

Paul Whiteman and his orches- 
tra were here this week en route 
to Seattle. The organization 
played over KFRC for its weekly 
nationwide broadcast. 

* * * 

Merton Bories, production man- 
ager of KPO, recently married. 

♦ * * 

Peggy Chapman, appearing over 
NBC’s network on the Firestone 
hour, is now also with the Pa- 
cific Vagabonds. 

!K * * 

Two new artists have been 
added to KTAB’s ranks. Olive 
Thornton, lyric soprano, made her 
station debut this week singing 
standard and semi-classic numbers 
with Jane Sargent Sands at the 
piano. John Teel, baritone, will 
be featured on the Poem Pictures 
program every Monday night from 
8 to 9. 

* * * 

On April 8 KPO begins its 
sixth consecutive year of sports 
broadcasting. Don Thompson, who 
is a newspaper man as well as an 
announcer, gives word pictures of 
the leading athletic events. 

« * 

KTAB has contracted for the 
electrical transcriptions of Baron 
Keyes’ “Klickity Klack” programs 
for the kiddies. They will be used 
as regular features over this sta- 
tion. 

^ :<c 

The California Rhythm Boys, Al 
and Ray, are singing over KTAB. 
They’re former vaude players. 

♦ * * 

Jerry Stewartson, arranger at 
NBC, turns out some splendid ar- 
rangements for the various or- 
chestral programs coming over that 
chain. 


Program 

Reviews 

(Continued from Page 8) 

KJR, SEATTLE 

(Reviewed March 29) 

The program opened with some 
cleverly-written continuity, assem- 
bled by Grant Merrill of the 
Northwest Broadcasting System’s 
staff, and spoken by Thomas 
Greybairn Smith, chief announcer 
of this chain. 

Agatha Turley opened the pro- 
gram with “An Indian Slumber 
Song,” a composition of H. Rik- 
ken’s, with words by Agnes 
Lockhart Hughes, local author. 
Miss Turley has a soprano voice 
of wide range, and an Irish twang 
to her singing helped sell the tune. 
A nice recording voice. “Hear Ye, 
Israel,” from the Oratorio “Eli- 
jah,” was Miss Turley’s second 
offering, and she did the heavy 
number full justice. 

Campbell-Tipton’s “ C r y i n ’ of 
Waters” was Sydney Dixon’s 
first offering on the half hour 
broadcast. Dixon has a beautiful 
tenor voice, with lots of power. 
He obviously knows his micro- 
phones, as his offerings came over 
well. “Dream On to My Song 
of Love” was Dixon’s second num- 
ber, and a better choice than the 
first. Here he had ample oppor- 
tunity to hit some high notes that 
rang out nicely. 

Harold Strong, staff pianist of 
the Northwest circuit, was heard 
in accompaniment to the singers. 
During an intermission he did 
Chopin’s “Waltz in D Flat” on 
the ivories, and Harold’s rendition 
was a classic. 

Agatha Turley sang “Villanelle,” 
with verve, and followed it with 
a trifle lighter offering, “It Was a 
Lover and a Lass,” in which she 
displayed capable handling of her 
vocal powers. 

Dixon brought the meritorious 
program to a close with a trio 
of numbers. His first, “Mighty 
Lak’ a Rose,” was nicely done and 
came over okay. He followed 
this with a light ditty, “Come Into 
the Garden, Maude,” the musical 
version of Tennyson’s popular 
poem. These two numbers clicked, 
and, with some time still left, 
Dixon offered “Thinking of Mary,” 
one of Bennett’s new compositions. 
The latter is a tune with merit, 
and Dixon’s handling of the lyrics 
and melody were very good. 

The recital went into the sys- 
tem’s three stations, KEX, Port- 
land; KGA, Spokane, and KJR, 
Seattle, from which it emanated. 

Jean. 

IMPOSlHTER 
IT STITIOII KGFJ 


KGFJ, the 24-hour station in 
Los Angeles, has gathered an im- 
posing roster of talent for its fu- 
ture feature programs. Among 
the leaders are: Paul Howard’s 

Serenaders. Ray West’s Hawaiian 
Quartet. Unique String Quintet, 
Arch Fritz, organist; Gladys Par- 
ish. blues; Hale Hooper, ballads; 
Blanche Cooper, pianist; Albert 
Keglovich, violinist; Haven John- 
son, pops: Bob Smith, the singing 
porter; Miniature Blackbirds or- 
chestra; Nat Winecoff, vocals, and 
Beth Whitney, blues. 

A wide variety of remote con- 
trols are taken for dance music, 
including Coonie Conrad and his 
El Patio Ballroom orchestra, Mos- 
by’s Dixieland Blue Blowers from 
the Apex Nite Club, the Yellow 
Jackets from Oaks Tavern, George 
Fabregat and Collegians from 
Orange Grove Cafe, and the Glenn 
Edmonds Hotel Alexandria or- 
chestra. 

This station has the reputation 
of never having been off the air 
for a moment since its first open- 
ing. 


ADAPTING “TOMMY” 


_ J. Walter Ruben has been as- 
signed to make the adaptation of 
“Tommy” for Radio Pictures from 
the stage play. Production is 
scheduled to begin within two 
weeks under Melville Brown’s di- 
rection. 


RE-SIGN MAUDE FULTON 


Maude Fulton has been signed 
under a contract by Warner Broth- 
ers to write adaptations and origi- 
nal stories. 


■ SCORES BIO 
SUCCESS IN N. W. 


SEATTLE, April 3. — From the 
viewpoint of consistent service to 
the listeners and high quality 
of programs offered, the record of 
KOMO in Seattle has been one 
of the outstanding successes in the 
Pacific Northwest. No station in 
the United States has, KOMO of- 
ficials say, ever been launched un- 
der more auspicious circumstances. 

A group of Pacific Northwest 
largest advertisers organized to- 
gether to lease the entire time of 
the new station, this time to be 
allocated among the membership. 
This organization,, known as Totem 
Broadcasters, virtually guaranteed 
to listeners of the Pacific North- 
west an all-day program of high- 
grade music. Its first schedule 
called for fourteen hours a day. 
This was revolutionary in view of 
the fact that practicaly no station 
in the Northwest was on for more 
than six hours a day, and that 
many times during the day and 
late evening not a single station 
could be found operating in the 
territory. 

Beginning with a schedule from 
10 a. m. to 12:30 a. m.. Totem 
Broadcasters immediately assem- 
bled a staff of approximately 40 
to carry out an elaborately de- 
signed program schedule. 

At the present time KOMO is 
the exclusive NBC outlet for its 
territory. 

In spite of_ the fact that the 
gradual extension of the pro.gram 
schedule with the National Broad- 
casting^ Companv has absorbed an 
increasing amount of the time of 
KOMO. the staff of KOMO has 
increased and numbers toflay 
about SO. This is a result of an 
effort to build programs originating 
locallv to a standard comparable 
to the programs of the NBC 
System. 

Station KOMO is one of the 
verv few stations, if not the only 
station, in the United States that 
can positively say it has never 
broadcast a phonograph record. 
Jts pay roll for artists participat- 
ing on its local programs in 1929 
was in excess of JlOO.OflO. Tlie 
present schedule of KOMO is 
from 7:55 a. m. to 12:30 a. m. A 
little more than one-third of this 
time is used for programs orig- 
inating with the National Broad- 
casting Company, both sustaining 
and commercial. The balance of 
the time is used by members of 
the Totem Broadcasters for their 
own programs. 

KOMO also originates 45^ 
hours per week of commercial 
programs to stations of the North- 
west Triangle (KHQ. Spokane; 
KGW, Portland, and KOMO). 


“MOBY DICK” STARTS 


The talkie version of “Moby 
Dick,” formerly made as a silent 
picture by John Barrymore under 
the title “Sea Beast,” has gone into 
production at Warners’, with Bar- 
rymore again in the starring role. 
Supporting cast includes Joan 
Bennett, Hobart Bosworth, Lloyd 
Hughes, Nigel De Brulier, Noble 
Johnson and May Boley. Lloyd 
Bacon is directing. 


Put On Plug 
But It All 
Goes Wrong 

A New York advertising agency, 
in arranging a newspaper display 
tie-up with an NBC broadcast for 
a beverage company, acted on the 
assumption that the program would 
be released through HFI and 
failed to check up. 

On the big day the ads ap- 
peared plugging the broadcast for 
KFI, but the program was re- 
leased over RECA. It so hap- 
pened, however, that a rival bever- 
age company put on a program 
over KFI at the same time and 
copped the tie-up. 

SMflifSli IS 
WIDEIV PDPU 


SEATTLE, April 3.— That burr 
in a voice radio audiences of 
Western America have come to 
know, belongs to Thomas Free- 
bairn Smith, young announcer in 
charge of that department for the 
Northwest Broadcasting System, 
emanating from KJR, Seattle. 

From Chicago to Los Angeles 
have come comments on that 
voice, brought to this country by 
Smith from his birthplace, Wey- 
mas Bay, Scotland. 

Theatre men of this territory are 
of the general opinion that if there 
ever was a voice adapted to film 
recording. Smith has it, and has 
it in generous quantities. A great 
bet for talking newsreels, says 
everyone. 


WANT FEM TALKER 

The National Broadcasting Com- 
pany is looking for a woman with 
a charming voice, apparently 
youthful, to give some beauty 
talks on a sponsored program, 
and KFI has been asked to put 
five candidates on the wires to 
headquarters for a test. 


PLAYING AT WHITCOMB 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
Art Fadden, radio pianist, will play 
during intermissions in Drury Lane 
of the Hotel Whitcomb every Sat- 
urday night, working in conjunc- 
tion with Wilt Gunzendorfer’s Or- 
chestra. 


HOUR DOESN’T GO ON 


The first Paramount song writ- 
er’s hour scheduled for RHJ last 
Thursday did not go on the air 
on account of lack of rehearsal. 


SEATTLE, April 3. — Mary Lou- 
ise Roderick, soprano, has joined 
the staff of Station KVI here. 


SIGNED BY KNX 


The vaudeville _ Newcombe-Hall 
troupe of entertainers have been 
signed for work over KNX, Hol- 
lywood. 


HOOT TO START 


Shooting of Hoot Gibson’s cur- 
rent vehicle, “Spure,” an original 
story by Reaves Eason, who will 
also direct the production, will get 
under way this week. Location 
scenes will be filmed at Lone Pine 
and Bishop, Calif. 




PAGE TEN 


INSIDE FACTS OF STAGE AND SCREEN 


SATURDAY, APRIL S, 1930 


VANCOUVER, B. C. 

A. K. MacMartin 

REPRESENTATIVE 
901 Bekiiu Bldg. 


^NORTHWEST'* 


WASHINGTON 

JEAN ARMAND district manager 

IDAHO 

OREGON 

502 EASTLAKE AVENUE 

MONTANA 


Seattle. Wa*li. 



Division Offices 


PORTLAND, ORE. 

F. K. Haskell 

REPRESENTATIVE 
Postoffice Box No. 16 


Phone: Capitol 1932 


GHRD GAi IS 
BILLED FOR BUTLER 


SEATTLE, April 3. — After 
much uncertainty as to whether or 
not he would have a name band 
with which to open the Butler 
Hotel Rose Room on May 8, John 
Savage, 'proprietor of the spot, is 
in receipt of word from the Music 
Corporation ' of America that Jack 
Crawford and his band will arrive 
to fill the bill. Ray Miller and his 
band were originally scheduled to 
show here, but reports have Miller 
skipping out, leaving his band 
stranded in New Orleans. 

Crawford is currently playing in 
the Roseland Ballroom, New York 
City . He arrives here in time to 
play a ten-day engagement, start- 
ing April 28, at Savage’s Trianon 
Ballroom, before going into the 
hotel spot. Crawford will be the 
first band Ito play the Rose Room 
in a year, the night club having 
been padlocked under order of the 
federal government. A new angle 
hit the Rose Room on Monday of 
this week, when Savage’s applica- 
tion for a license was scheduled to 
come before the City Council. Roy 
Lyle, divisional federal prohibition 
officer, went before the council 
with a lengthy brief in opposition 
to Savage’s application. Lyle as- 
serted that the spot was a public 
nuisance, due to its many difficul- 
ties with the federals. The council 
postponed action on Savage’s ap- 
plication for one week. 



VANCOUVER, April 3.— Da- 
vid Clyde and Norman Cannon, 
owners of the British Guild Play- 
ers, stock company which has met 
with the popular approval of local 
fans, have purchased the Empress 
Theatre, where they have been 
playing, from the Sun Life As- 
surance Co, The house, an old- 
fas'hioned one with two balconies, 
will be remodeled by the new own- 
ers at a later date. 

The Empress has passed through 
some strenuous times the past few 
years and owing to the fact that 
more failures than clicks have been 
the record, the house has practi- 
cally been considered out of the 
running until the British Guild 
Players went in and hit on all 
eight from the gun. 

They paid $60,000 for the house. 


DAISY D’ARVA ILL 


VANCOUVER.— Daisy D’Avra, 
who is well known in theatrical 
circles both East and AVest, lies 
dangerously ill at the Vancouver 
General Hospital here. Physicians 
are in close attendance. Alf 
Layne, her husband, is with her, 
as are Fred Eggert and his wife 
from San Francisco. Miss D’Avra 
has been ill since Jan. 1 with sep- 
tic heart. 


IS COLUMBIA MGR. 

SEATTLE, April 3. — Andy Gun- 
nard, for the past eight months af- 
filiated with Publix here, has joined 
John Danz’s Sterling Chain The- 
atres as manager of the Columbia, 


EDDIE KAY 

Extemporaneous 
Master of Ceremonies 


The Tavern 

Salt Lake Gty, Utah 

Hello, Everybody! Starting my 
engagement in Salt Lake after 
fourteen week* at Coffee Dan’*. 
Don’t forget to *ee me at The 
Tavern, Salt Lake City, Utah. 


VANCOUVER 

By A. K. MacMARTIN 


VANCOUVER, April 3. — The 
current stanza showed a better 
batting average at the leading b. 
o.’s, and a pick-up _ right down the 
line to and including the suburb- 
anities. Fine weather and strong 
attractions pulled the fans out in 
force. Instead of taking a drop 
at the Empress after the long run 
of seven weeks for “Elizabeth 
Sleeps Out,” “The Play’s the 
Thing” went to bat with all the 
original house regulars depositing, 
being so forte that “The Play” 
went into its second week mer- 
rily. 

Lee Jaxon and his Tab Show 
at the Theatre Rolal did capacity 
at nights . and fair matinees. Three- 
a-day along with a silent picture 
program making up a two-hour 
show, caught on with the fans. 

W. B.’s “The Sacred Flame 
stood them out at the Dominion 
both matinee and nights. In all 
advertising a line was carried stat- 
ing that on account of the delicate 
theme of the picture it was not 
advisable for children under 16 
to be admitted. This seemed to 
wow the fans and they fought to 
be first in the line. 

The R-K-O Orpheum got its 
quota with Natacha Nattova head- 
lining the four-ast bill of vaude 
and “Pointed Heels” the screen 
fare. 

At the Capitol U. A.’s “Con- 
demned” with Ronald Colman, and 
the last week of Alfredo Meunier 
and his New Capitolians and Sid- 
ney Kelland, organist, jammed in 
the night business. No announce- 
ment was made that it was fare- 
well week for the band; they sim- 
ply fold up on Friday night, and 
the Saturday customers are to 
walk in on a cold house. 

The Colonial with Warner Bros.’ 
“She Couldnt’ Say No.” Winnie 
Lightner and Chester Morris, had 
nothing to complain of, night busi- 
ness being better than normal. 

U. A.’s “New York Nights” at 
the Strand also was among those 
doing well. 

The Beacon (former Pan) was 
not so forte with “The Great 
Gabbo.” This house is not pull- 
ing them, while across the street 
the Rex with “One Stolen Night” 
or any old thing, has a steady fol- 
lowing of fans. 

* * * 

Conklin & Garrett’s Carnival 
Shows, with headquarters in this 
city, open their season May 1 
with the annual Elks’ Circus on 
the Cambie street grounds. Their 
winter quarters on C. P. R. track- 
age property has become a scene 
of much animation, their equip- 
ment is being overhauled and the 
fifteen cars which comprise the 
housing and road quarters of the 
aggregation, are being dolled up 
with new paint. 

* * * 

The Dominion Theatre, one of 
the F. P. C. Corporation chain, a 
small house with a capacity of 
only 900, is one of the winners 
among the down-town houses they 
operate in this city. Playing first 
and second run talkies this house 
turns over $3500 to $4000 weekly. 
Every Saturday night from 12 mid- 
night onward the “Dominion 
Whoopee Party” is broadcast over 
CJOR, and this stunt alone is help- 
ing a great deal on the draw. The 
house manager, Ivan Ackery, gets 
close to his patrons in more ways 
than one. During the course of 
the radio routine he invites his fans 
to send in criticisms of the cur- 
rent feature and offer suggestions 
for programs and future attrac- 
tions. 


SPENCER’S PLANS 


SEATTLE, April 3. — Frank 
Spencer, local musician, has sev- 
ered connections with Vic Mey- 
er’s Orchestra to devote his time 
to radio work and teaching. Spen- 
cer will _ have banjo studios with 
the Pacific Musk Company and 
work before a mike at KOMO. 


BREAKS FINGER 


SPOKANE. Wash., April 3.— 
Natacha Nattova, dancer, broke a 
finger while playing the RKO Or- 
pheum here, but didn’t leave the 



NOSEDIVE AT FOX 


SEATLE, April 3. — Publix and 
West Coast ran a dead heat in the 
race for boxoffice honors during 
the week. Publix’s Paramount, 
with Ruth Chatterton in “Sarah 
and Son,” was the scene of lots 
of activity for this spot, gather- 
ing, if at all, a few more dollars 
than the Fox-Fifth Avenue. The 
West Coast house had Joan Craw- 
ford in M-G-M’s “Montana Moon,” 
backed up with Fanchon and Mar- 
co’s “Peasant I d e a,” drawing 
plenty word-of-mouth advertising; 
$18,000 reported for each of these 
two spots plenty good and profit- 
able for both. 

R-K-O’s Orpheum was up a bit, 
getting $11,000 with William Boyd 
on the screen in Pathe’s “Officer 
O’Brien” and a nice vaude bill 
headed by Ken Murray and Foster, 
Fagan and Cox. Show well liked, 
with plenty of laughs. 

“Happy Days” Poor 

The New Fox had the second 
session of Fox’s revue, “Happy 
Days,” getting a meager $4500 for 
the final seven days. Biz on this 
one tapered off after the initial 
stanza. John Hamrick’s two 
houses fared fairly. “Tr<k>pers 
Three” (Tiffany) got $5500 at his 
Music Box. which, while under 
average, still was profitable. The 
Blue Mouse, across the street, had 
Columbia’s “Mexicali Rose,” which 
garnered $5250, not to be sneezed 
at here. 

The Metropolitan, Erlanger house 
under the Publix regime, had 
Gary Cooper in “Only the Brave” 
(Paramount) to nice biz, showing 
a profit on the six-day run of this 
one. 

Night Clubs Up 

Night clubs were better during 
the past week. Tiny Burnett and 
his Band at the Olympic Hotel’s 
Venetian Gardens still drawing 
hefty crowds, while Vic Meyer’s 
Club Victor, featuring Carolynne 
Snowden and Billy Ulman as en- 
tertainers, enjoyed a prosperous 
week. 

Dance halls having a great pa- 
per battle. John Savage flooding 
his Trianon Ballroom Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday with 
free ducats, filling the joint. The 
move helps some, as he gets the 
dough from checking and eats, 
whereas the spot_ was formerly 
empty on three nights. Monday, 
Friday and Saturday here still the 
town’s biggest. Cole McElroy’s 
Spanish Ballroom continues to 
stand in good with the fox-trot 
fanciers. Not much paper here, 
but profitable houses nightly, with 
Monday, Wednesday and Saturday 
playing to paid capacity. 

Current Week Good 

Coffee Dan’s new basement joint, 
still showing a profit according to 
the management. Why some 
changes, obviously necessary be- 
fore the spot can become a per- 
sistent clicker, are not made still 
remains a mystery. Big play still 
gotten by the newness and novelty. 

Current attractions getting the 
dough, with “Vagabond King” at 
the Publix-Paramount head and 
shoulders over the field. 


ON AIR OVER KXL 


PORTLAND, Ore.. April 3.— 
“Cowboy” Jack Willis and his wife 
were here recently on the air over 
station KXL, guests of the an- 
nouncer, Maurie Harris. “Cow- 
boy” is now_ under the manage- 
ment of Tim McGrath. Mrs. 
Willis is a dancer. 


KENIN IN BROADWAY 


PORTLAND, Ore., April 3. — 
Another change in stage bands 
looms for the Fox-Broadway. Sam 
Jack Kauffman and his Merry Mu- 
sical Specialties will be succeed- 
ed at the end of March by Her- 
man Kenin and his Band for an 
indefinite engagement. 

SEATTLE, April 3. — ^The latest 
newspaper man to turn press agent 
in this town is Ross Cunningham, 
on the Star for several years. Ross 
left the Scripps sheet to become 
counsel of public relations for the 
Alaska-Washing;ton Air Lines, op- 
erating from here into Canada and 
Alaska. 


Notes Along 
Fifth Avenue 

SEATTLE, April 3. — Many 
cases of spring fever . . . Jim 
Clemmer keeping abreast of the 
times with colorful drapes in his 
back-stage dressing room . . . 
Betty Shilton losing her wrist 
watch . . . Myrtle Strong enter- 
taining visitors . . . Ken Murray 
playing cards, and losing money 
(20c) . . . Herbie Hemlow talking 
insurance . . . Johnny Northen and 
Hazel Atkinson listening to the 
band . . . Ken Schoenfeld tele- 
graphing from Ellensburg . . . 
Shelby Cole and Lou Golden hur- 
rying downstairs . . . Owen Sweet- 
en getting his trumpet back in a 
flower box handed across the foot- 
lights . . . Buddy Jenkins now a 
full-fledged member of the band 
. . . Bill Ross singing at the 
Trianon . . . Tex Howard writing 
checks . . . Harry McAllister and 
Kate in an argument over finances 
. . . Mace Chamberlain before the 
mike . . . Sydney Dixon entering 
a theatre . . . and paying for the 
ticket . . . Tom Curtis getting 
band boys on the cuff . . . Tommy 
Rich washing Johnny Sylvester’s 
car . . . Syl Halperin’s in the hos- 
pital . . . Lou Oudeen buying lunch 
for the b. f. . . . Bill Woodbury 
and Earl Kelly busy over fishing 
poles . . . Ernie Baley and Morris 
Cady watching the steel erection 
. . . Bob Armstrong comfortably 
settled in the new job . . . Art 
Kennedy the same . . . Fred More- 
lock, Bob Dickinson, Bus Greene 
and Don Anderson cutting music 
and pasting it back together again 
. . . Sammy Gore and Jean Singer 
dancing together . . . Tommy 

Smith preparing for a voice test 
. . . Gladys Brannon working 
double shift . . . Bun Mulligan 
eating in a hurry . . . Vic Gaunt- 
lett hurrying up the street . . . 
Jim Meriam working late and on 
Sunday . . . Genevieve Murray 
torn between emotions . . . Spec 
Thomas missing . . . Bill Hartung 
looking at a picture . . . Freddie 
walking up and down the aisles 
. . . George Hayes moving scenery 
. . . Harry Peletier downtown late 
at night . . . Pearl Harris on Pike 
street . . . Dave Himelhoch buy- 
ing dinner for two on 35c . . . Nick 
Schmitz trying to stage a pay-off 
. . . J. W. Houck looking for a 
photographer . . . George Pink- 
man meditating . . . George Ka- 
lushe reading . . . Ted Harris in- 
terviewing Eddie Fitzgerald . . . 
A. McRae, Roy Cooper, A. M. 
Dunlap, A1 Bloom, Neal East, 
Wally Rucker, Harold Harden, 
Mickey Carney, Art Goliphant, 
Paul Mclllhaney and Harry Blatt 
parading on film row . . . Johnny 
Falk looking for parties . . . Harry 
Mills anticipating ’em . . . dinner 
time . . . see you next week. 


DUFFWIN CLOSING 

HALTED BY DEMAND 


PORTLAND, Ore.. April 3.— 
In spite of repeated reports of 
closing of the Duffwin Theatre 
two months earlier than usual, an- 
nouncement is now officially made 
that the house will continue. Im- 
mediately the closing date was set 
many and varied were the com- 
plaints _ sent in and constructive 
suggestions for a continuance of 
the company and their offerings, 
backed up with real finances and 
therefore a number of new and 
popular shows are salted which 
will keep the house open and busi- 
ness good for several months to 
come. 

Following the Frank Craven’s 
comedy “Salt Water” will be 
“Jonesy,” “Smilin’ Thru,” “Bird of 
Paradise” and “The Ghost Train.” 

Leona Powers is the new lead- 
ing lady with the Duffy Players. 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
Ted Brown has been promoted to 
the chief usher’s job at R-K-O’s 
Golden Gate. 


FIRM’S EHCE 
ON 1 MYSTERY 


SEATTLE, April 3. — Big 
splurges in the dailies here her- 
alding the entrance of Jensen and 
Von Herberg, pioneer theatrical 
men, into the radio field resulted 
in a fast moving series of rumors. 
One sheet even went so far as 
to run a banner line on the yarn, 
the body of the story admitting 
that the deal was a mere rumor 
and highly problematical. 

A check-up of all stations in 
town failed to reveal what con- 
cern was figuring on a sale to 
Jensen and Von Herberg. who re- 
cently reopened the Liberty The- 
atre after repossessing it from 
West Coast, to whom they sold 
three years ago. One station, for 
which there is admittedly a deal 
pending, offered conclusive proof 
that the transaction was not with 
J. and V. 

Affirms Rumor 

LeRoy V. Johnson, managing 
director for the Jensen-Von Her- 
berg theatrical interests, affirmed 
the rumor that his concern was 
negotiating for some one local sta- 
tion. He intimated that the sta- 
tion desired must have free chan- 
nel privileges and a fair amount 
of prestige with local fans. When 
questioned as to why his firm was 
interested in radio, Johnson re- 
plied: “The theatre business has 
got to the point where we are 
forced to go into radio to adver- 
tise our attractions and to develop 
features for our programs.” 
Expects Suit 

One paper’s assertion that the 
auditing of the Amos ’n Andy 
program nightly by Jensen and 
Von Herberg at their three sub- 
urban houses prompted them to 
consider in order to secure addi- 
tional such features for these 
stands was laughed off by John- 
son. Johnson further stated that 
he momentarily expected the Na- 
tional Broadcasting Company to 
institute suit against his firm in 
an effort to prohibit them from 
receiving the Amos ’n Andy pro- 
gram in the theatre for the bene- 
fit of the audience. The NBC has 
already brought such suits against 
theatres in the East, but the most 
Johnson has heard, officially, is a 
letter from the chain notifying 
him that action will be taken. In 
the meantime, Johnson continues to 
give his audiences the radio fea- 
ture nightly. 


LEE JAXON COMEDY CO. 
IN ROYAL MUSICAL TAB 


VANCOUVER, April 3.— The 
Lee Jaxon Comedy Company with 
a cast of five principals including 
Lee_ Jaxon, comic, 'H. C. Willis, 
straight, Billie Reams, prima don- 
na, Peewee Nair, soubrette, and 
a line of ten girls, have opened 
at the Theatre Royal in musical 
tab. This- house is only a block 
from the Empress where the Brit- 
ish Guild Players are stacking them 
in to see “The Play’s the Thing,” 
now going into its second week. 

The Lee Jaxon Co., which is 
putting across a snappy show, is 
also pulling big business and looks 
set for a long stay. The Royal 
is operated by W. P. Nichols, who 
has a chain of small houses includ- 
ing the Coliseum at Victoria. 


IS BALLROOM MANAGER 


SEATTLE, April 3. — Tom Cur- 
tis, affiliated with Cole J. “Pops” 
McElroy, dancehall impressario, 
for many years in orchestral and 
managerial positions, has been 
named by McElroy as manager of 
the local Spanish Ballroom. Cur- 
tis, whom “Pops” considers a pro- 
tege, Tom having been in his em- 
ploy for the past ten years, will 
handle the business end of the lo- 
cal spot in addition to playing bass 
with the band. 


THE CROONIKG WALTZ HIT! 

“ROCK-A-BYE TO SLEEP IN DIXIE” 

Send for Orchestrations — VOCALS — QUARTETTES 

S. L. CROSS MUSIC CORP. Seattle, U.S.A. 



SATURDAY, APRIL S, 1930 


INSIDE FACTS OF STAGE AND SCREEN 


PAGE ELEVEN 



“PHILADELPHIA” 

VINE STREET THEATRE 
LOS ANGELES 
(Reviewed March 30) 

“Satire” is the word used to 
describe this melodrama of polit- 
ical and legal corruption, but 
events are so well done as to be 
almost believable. The recent vogue 
of underworld stories and pictures, 
plus daily press headlines scream- 
ing of this expose and that probe, 
lend plausibility to a plot that in- 
volves a law firm whose senior 
partner is crooked with friend, foe, 
client and junior partner, the lat- 
ter cut to the law school pattern 
of high idealism and “e pluribus 
unum” and who ultimately turns 
crook in self defense. Even Jun- 
ior’s sweetheart, his inspiration to 
better things, joins him in false 
witness and tells a big lie for him 
to her father, a Supreme Court 
judge, and what the old man him- 
self turns out to be at the final 
curtain is plenty. 

The play is sensational through- 
out, climax capping climax, events 
moving in continuous sequence 
from first to final curtain, the in- 
termissions being periods of ar- 
rested action somewhat similar to 
“Rope’s End.” But although there 
are episodes of broad comedy the 
theme is sardonic. There is loud 
laughter, but always at the ex- 
pense of some character, and the 
cumulation is a cynical laugh at 
lawyers, district attorneys, police- 
men and judges. The boxoffice 
power lies in its difference from 
the ordinary run-of-legit shows, 
and the appeal urban. 

Individual performances were 
smooth this first night after the 
show’s brief workout at Long 
Beach. In this company of 
crooks, chief attention was fo- 
"cussed upon Rockliffe Fellowes 
and Franklyn Farnum in the roles 
of senior and junior law partners, 
both appearing typically lawyer- 
like and taking full advantage of 
their opportunities. 

The most spectacular perform- 
ance of the evening was turned in 
by Del Lawrence in the role of 
police inspector. Robert Millikin 
was cast for this part but was 
taken ill on the morning of the 
opening and Lawrence filled the 
breach with only 12 hours of study. 
It would be hard to imagine a 
better performance even with many 
rehearsals to his credit, and his 


delineation of a hardboiled cop 
succumbing to financial temptation 
to his subsequent discomfiture was 
a classic of characterization. Law- 
rence is to continue in the part. 

-\nother colorful role was con- 
tributed by Frank Dawson as a 
body-robbing coroner whose hands 
sought pockets before pulses, and 
a picturesque character also was 
that of a hell-roaring hospital in- 
terne played by James Guilfoyle. 
Between them they generated 
many a belly laugh. 

Kit Guard more than adequately 
filled the role of the gangster go- 
between and killer. The part was 
a natural for him in every way. 

Barbara Bedford’s pleasing con- 
tralto voice and personal charm 
served her well in the ingenue 
part of the junior lawyer’s sweet- 
heart, marking her performance a 
high point of the show. Her best 
work was done in the second act 
where she reflected a most de- 
lightful poise and self-control as 
well as resourcefulness in a brow- 
beating scene with the police. A 
charming girl of true capability. 

Ora Carew appeared Ijriefly as 
a flaming lady desiring to beat her 
husband to a divorce. Her lines 
were clearly and tellingly deliv- 
ered; her charm and beauty self- 
apparent. Kitty Leeds, as a chirk- 
ily competent law stenographer, 
breezed entertainingly in and out 
of her scenes and never failed to 
hold them up. 

Others in the cast were Ross 
Chetwynd, crooked district attor- 
ney; James Gordon, judge; George 
Morrell and Frank Lengel, dicks. 
Also appearing on the program but 
not on the stage were “Morocco 
Oliver” and “Grauman Sid,” 
stretcher bearers. The author of 
the piece is Samuel John Park; 
director, Warren Millais, all work- 
ing for Andy Wright, producer. 

Y eat es. 


“THE HERO” 

MUSIC BOX THEATRE 
HOLLYWOOD 
(Reviewed March 31) 

The market value of “The Hero” 
to the Civic Repertory remains to 
be seen. It’s one of those things 
they may fall for — and again they 
may not. The Music Box was 
never so nearly on its feet as it has 
been since the advent of the Civic 
Repertory. And it is gaining 
ground rapidly by way of consist- 


D AINTY 



XYLOPHONISTE — DANSEUSE 

Y outh — Melody — Personality and Speed 
Fourth Season 


RKO Show, State Theatre, Long Beach, April 6-13 

OPEN FOR engagements IN AND AROUND LOS ANGELES 
AFTER MAT 1ST 

Address; Warrene Music Studio, 720 Garfield Avenue, 
South Pasadena — El. 1557 

THANKS TO BEENIE BERNARD, BEN PIAZZA AND HARRY WALLEN 


Just Returned From European Recital Tour 
The International Concert Artiste 

ADELA VERNE 

Most Distinguished of Women Pianists 

FIFTH CONSECUTIVE SEASON 
WITH R-K-O 

THIS WEEK 

RKO-ORPHEUM 

OAKLAND 


NEXT WEEK 

RKO THEATRE 

LOS ANGELES 


ently good productions. “The 
Hero” is their first sign of weak- 
ening. 

The cast as a whole, which does 
not include any of the members 
of the regular Repertory troupe, 
is not as good as usual. _ Some- 
one made a serious error in cast- 
ing strictly to type and without 
due consideration to ability and 
experience. That is a modern 
theatrical habit which we were 
beginning to hope the Repertory 
had not acquired. 

However, foyer gossip fell large- 
ly on the favorable side of the 
fence. On the excellence of Grant 
Mitchell’s performance there was 
no dissention whatever. The set 
was ostentatious in its ugliness 
and created an effect of bad taste 
rather than the helpless poverty 
with which the characters strug- 
gled. It should at least have been 
homelike. 

The subject matter of Gilbert 
Emery's play is not one designed 
wholly for entertainment. It 
brings inter the foreground a side 
of the World War which many 
are inclined to ignore. It is un- 
pleasant. It is a dark valley in 
which Eugene O’Neill would de- 
light in browsing. Yet O’Neill 
could not have found his way out 
of it any more surely than this 
Emery. The drama is just as 
deft, the humor as grim, and the 
p.sychological penetration just as 
deep as O’Neill would have it 
without the picture being an en- 
tity of brutality and selfishness 
inclined to offend a public still 
believing that now and then there 
still lives a man with strength 
enough to battle his own instincts. 

Andrew and Hester Lane have 
been married for several years. 
They have a small son. They are 
typical of thousands of people — 
afraid to think. Andrew is treas- 
urer of the church and is proud 
of the minister calling him his 
“Rock of Gibraltar.” That’s the 
kind of a fellow he is. Poor but 
honest. And when Fate hands 
him another one he grins and 
cracks another bad pun. 

His wife is reasonably content- 
ed. She wants a new dress and 
some of the things other girls 
have, but she could have enjoyed 
going right on being a martyr if 
Oswald, the missing brother, had 
not returned. 

This Oswald is the black sheep 
of the family — ^just a bum, has 
been around a lot, and in the war; 
but to the wife who never knew 
romance he is a mystical char- 
acter from another world — ’’the 
hero.” 

In the house are also a Bel- 
gian girl, Martha, who does part 
of the housework for board and 
room, and the pill-taking mother 
of the two brothers. 

Oswald’s taste runs to foreign 
girls, and Martha can’t resist him. 

The second act finds Oswald re- 
turning from church where he has 
given a lecture about the war. 
He finds Martha in a state of de- 
pression, and he puts two and 
two together and gets the right 
answer. The girl is rather in a 
spot with no money. In stalk 
the family group, Andrew bearing 
the proceeds of the lecture amount- 
ing to around $500. Then we 
knew it was coming and we 
weren’t wrong. Oswald has glued 
an eye on the church money. 

After the rest of the family 
retire there follows a morbid lit- 
tle scene in which Hester tells 
Oswald how marvelous he is and 
makes it plain that she could be 
his for the asking. It is only 
when she comes back into the 
room and finds him in the act of 
filching the funds that it dawns 
on her that this brother-in-law of 
hers is a bit of a bad egg. 

So far Oswald’s only human 
quality has been a great love for 
his little nephew. He is a born 
parasite, and takes offense when 
Andrew suggests after three months 
that he might contribute a little 
to the family budget. 

The sun rises on the third act. 
To add to the unpleasantness, the 
mother, oblivious to all that is 
going on in the house, is prepar- 
ing to attend a funeral. Oswald 
is still in the house and has the 
money. Hester knows by this 
time about the Belgian girl and 
also knows that our “hero” is 
planning to use the money for his 
own transportation back to France. 
He goes from the house, leaving 
two disillusioned women. Fire en- 
gines are heard rushing by, and 
shortly comes the news that the 
kindargarten has burned and Os- 
wald has saved the life of his little 
nephew at the expense of his 
own. It is Hester’s chance to 


keep up the illusion of the man. 
and she lies honorably — yes, Os- 
wald was just on his way to the 
bank. Of course, they will have 
to pay back the money that 
burned with money that should go 
toward the kid’s education, but 
to them it means a great deal that 
Oswald is still “the hero” in the 
eyes of the neighbors. 

The Civic Repertory made no 
mistake in starring Grant Mitchell 
in his original role in the produc- 
tion. His is a sympathetic per- 
sonality that digs deep. His pathos 
and humor are closely interwoven 
and will be a long time remem- 
bered. It is an excellently drawn 
character, and he rates aces all 
around. 

Helen Keers was the only face 
card in the deck otherwise. She 
did a standard mother of the ail- 
ing type with great naturalness. 

Walter Vaughn as Oswald shown 
in spots, some good, some bad. 

Norma Lee was the weak wife, 
cast to type. 

Georgette Rhodes played the un- 
intelligible Belgian girl, and Jackie 
Sarle did credit to the young son 
for whom Oswald died. 

E. R. T. 


“BROKEN DISHES” 

EL CAPITAN THEATRE 

HOLLYWOOD 
(Reviewed March 30) 

Another Henry Duffy produc- 
tion of a play about the Great 
American family, in which the 
playwright, Martin Flavin, has 
overstepped the bounds of coin- 
cidency and dragged in happen- 
stance too freely, sacrificing logic 
and conviction to expediency. 

Everybody knows that strange 
coincidences do happen in life, 
but not regularly, and everybody 
knows that while accidents hap- 
pen in the best regulated families 
they should not happen illogically 
in stories or plays just to bring 
about a denounement. Such ex- 
pediency does not mark clever 
play-writing. 

“Broken Dishes” is the story of 
a family dominated by a mother 
who incessantly preaches to her 
daughters that they must not make 
the mistake she herself made, that 
of marrying a routine breadwin- 
ner. She holds up to them the 
mental image of a man she claims 
she might have married, a tall, ro- 
mantic six-footer with black curly 
hair and a black moustache, who 
now controls a bank or a railroad 
or both. One daughter outsmarts 
her, however, and marries a de- 
livery boy. 

At this point walks in a pros- 
perous looking man with black 
curly hair and a black moustache, 
none other than the sweetheart of 
other days! But not only have we 
the coincidence of his arrival at a 
critical moment, after a thirty 
years absence, but it develops that 
it is also a coincidence that he 
appears as the mother described 
him, as actually he is red-headed 
and used to be known as “Brick.” 
And to make matters worse he 
never was rich, was formerly the 
town butcher boy and is now a 
fugitive from justice in disguise! 

And so it develops that after all 
mother had made the wise choice 
and daughter becomes justified in 
marrying the boy she loves. 
Poor nagged and downtrodden 
papa now looms larger on the 
family horizon and need no longer 
wash dishes. 

However, the production is well 
enough staged and there is suffi- 
cient comedy in the work of the 
three character actors, Percy Pol- 
lock, Tom Brower and Lloyd 
Neal, to provide acceptable enter- 
tainment for the customers. 

Pollock, perhaps best known for 
his work in “Lightnin’,” turns in 
a finished performance as the sub- 
merged pa of the family, and he is 
very ably supported by Brower as 
the ancient parson and Neal as 
an equally ancient grave digger. 
Grace Stafford is the rebel daugh- 


ter, and endows a colorless part 
with lively ability. Opposite her 
is Melville Ruick in the juvenile 
role of delivery boy which re- 
quires little but the straight read- 
ing of lines, and the mother is 
played with conviction by Alma 
Chester. Also in the cast are Joan 
Warner and Helen Kleeb, over- 
powered daughters of the domi- 
nant mother; Thomas Chatterton, 
the dream lover, and Donald 
Campbell, a dick. 

Edwin H. Curtis directed with 
his usual finesse, and the simple 
unobtrusive set was designed by 
Ernest Glover. 

Paul Einstein’s orchestra fur- 
nished pleasing music during the 
intermisions. Business was good. 

Yeates. 


“SPINDRIFT” 

COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE 

PASADENA 
(Reviewed March 29) 

A genuine “little theatre” pro- 
duction of a play, by the thought- 
ful playwright, Martin Flavin, 
which proves to be a delicious 
joke. 

“Spindrift” is an art home on 
the California coast, close enough 
to the sea for us to hear the surf 
and almost feel the tingle of blown 
spray — spindrift, the term also ap- 
plied symbolically to the bohe- 
mian-minded inhabitants. The prin- 
cipals are a middle aged man who 
had always longed to be an artist 
but had been compelled to follow 
a commercial career until falling 
heir to a comfortable legacy; his 
wife whose art hobby was keep- 
ing a stone mason busy tearing 
down and rebuilding until the 
legacy was about spent; a son 
whom the father had determined 
should become a great artist. 

Within the circle of this group 
we find a famous ■ sculptor and his 
mistress; a retired leather man 
from St. Louis and his daughter; 
a pair of tourists, the vw>man of 
which has “art” aspirations and 
wishes to buy “Spindrift”; and a 
playwright who always has a mar- 
velous idea that he will some day 
turn into a play. 

The son falls in love with the 
sculptor’s mistress, the tourists 
practically close_ the deal for the 
purchase of “spindrift,” the money 
from which is to taken the son to 
Paris for art study. Then, all in 
one evening comes the suicide of 
the leather man, the elopement of 
the son, an earthquake and the 
death of a maid — ^the only religious 
one in the group — then comes the 
dawn and the cancellation of the 
deal by the scared tourists, and in 
no time at all everything is as it 
was. Father takes up his_ paint 
brush, son looks on in admiration 
after having declared for a com- 
mercial life, mother plans the re- 
habilitation of a destroyed chimney, 
and the final curtain lowers casu- 
ally upon the group being har- 
rangued by the playwright on the 
subject of a marvelous idea for a 
play. 

It is all a huge _ joke on bo- 
hemianism and its disciples, some- 
what disconcerting to normal rou- 
tine workers who feel they are be- 
ing cheated out of something, but 
keenly enjoyed to the accompani- 
ment of many chuckles by those 
who know or are of the arties. 

The production was thorough in 
((Continued on Page IS) 


Leonard Stevens 

More Than Just a 
Piano Player at 

B. H. 3. 

CELLAR CAFE 

HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. 
NIGHTLY 

P. S. — Ask Anybody^ in the 
Music Business 
Direction of B. B. B. 


JOE 

WILLIAMS 

“JUST ME” 


DANCING WITH 


OLSEN and JOHNSON 

EN TOUR 

RKO CIRCUIT 


PAGE TWELVE 


INSIDE FACTS OF STAGE AND SCREEN 


SATURDAY, APRIL 5 , 1930 


Facts* Echoes From Melody Land 



By JACK B. TENNEY 

The average dance - musician 
strikes me as a very improvident 
sort of a fellow. I suppose there 
are beaucoup excuses, but none of 
them are too good. This type of 
musician is always in one of two 
places — working and on top of the 
world, or looking for a job and 
broke. Even while they are work- 
ing things are not always as they 
should be. They are usuallly broke 
the day after pay-day. 

I’ve talked to some of them 
about it and haven’t received many 
reasonable answers as yet. One 
told me that he had not been for 
tunate enough to find the right 
break — that is, landed a job that 
lasted long enough for the next 
famine. There may be a lot of 
truth in this, at that, and a check- 
up might be startling. It certain 
ly is pathetic to always be paying 
up for the time when you were 
not working and had to borrow, 
but it is more than pathetic to 
have the job go “boom-boom” just 
as you begin to see daylight. 

There is no doubt that some of 
our indigent brothers have this al 
most logical excuse. On the othy 
hand it will be discovered that 
most of these same brothers are 
driving a very late model auto- 
mobile with only seventeen pay- 
ments to go. It also will be found 
that they possess most of the mod- 
ern nicknacks that may be deliv- 
ered for a dollar or so down. One 
musician of my acquaintance lost 
two automobiles and a radio in 
the same year. A certain finance 
company is quite eager to locate 
another. 

I am not one of those brainy 
individuals who oppose luxuries for 
the improvident poor. That ar- 
gument about “the more some 
people get, the less they have” 
never carried any weight with me. 
It is too much like refusing to 
give a starving tramp chicken and 
pie when you might give him 
hash, on the theory that the big 
bum will eat it all up anyway. It 
is a rather healthy human charac- 
teristic to want one of everything 
and there is no valid reason why 
anyone should not have all they 
can get — even if the finance com- 
panies get the most in the long 
run. But the wise bird will stop 
and ponder a little and try to dope 
the matter out to his own advan- 
tage. 

The average musician usually 
makes a fair wage, if the job isn’t 
one of those arrangements where 
he gives the leader a present every 
week and turns back a twenty to 
,the management, so the Steward 
sheet will appear O. K. If he is 
young (of course, he will be 
thoughtless) he might well con- 
sider the probable number of years 
of earning ability ahead of him. 
A fair idea of the possible num- 
ber might be ascertained from the 
ages of those who have involun- 
tarily retired in the old home town. 


During the probable number of 
years of remunerative exertion (it 
it best to prepare for the worst, 
you know) our young musician 
should figure that many months 
will bring goose-eggs on the bank- 
book. It is surprising how the 
bills roll in whether one has the 
wherewithal or not. And, of 
course, even Hercules is liable to 
come 'down with the mumps or 
something. In short, a musician 
should save at least a third of 
what he makes if he is desirous at 
all of avoiding a relief-list some- 
where in the future. 

To tell the truth, I never had 
a great deal of respect for the ant 
in that starving grasshopper story 
His smug respectability and self- 
satisfaction always seemed a little 
too much at the expense of the 
grasshopper. He didn’t even re 
fer the poor insect to the Com 
munity Chest of which, no doubt, 
he was a subscribing member. He 
was too busy extolling his own 
virtues by comparison. My sym- 
pathies always went out to that 
cold and hungry grasshopper. How 
was he supposed to know that 
winter would come? He reminded 
me of a lot of musicians — of my- 
self, and I felt a keen antipathy 
for that fat ant gloating over the 
grasshopper and his wasted oppor 
tunities, lack of foresight and the 
attendant miseries. It became 
new kind of fable for me and the 
moral I read into it was different 
than the one Aesop intended. It 
carried a sting that was consider- 
ably worse than the ignominy of 
starving to death. But no matter 
how you look at it, the fable is 
well worth thinking about. 

+ * ♦ 

Musically, things over in Phoe 
nix are not so bad as they were 
and not so good as they might be 
From all reports the former non- 
union houses have gone union. No 
doubt the matter was a compro 
mise. The non-union ' orchestras 
faded out of the limelight in the 
picture palaces, and synchornized 
films took their places. There is 
not a stage-band in town and not 
a pit-orchestra that I know of, 
Dance-bands, however, are flour- 
ishing. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

The Phoenix local A. F. of M 
staged a banquet at the PalmS; 
April 1. Invitations carried the 
proviso of “paid-up cards, only.” 

* * * 

Joey Starr, leader of the orches 
tra at the Rendezvous at Mesa 
became a benedict last month 
when he married the former Miss 
Rose Spitz of New York. Tiny 
Hardesty, trombonist with Joy’s 
band, refused to be outdone by 
his leader and married Miss Berma 
Babbitt of Mesa. Arizona. Hot 
Licks offers a lot of congratula- 
tions and best wishes. 

* ♦ * 

Lyol “Spike” Thayer is report- 
ed as leaving the Westward Ho 
(Continued on Page 13) 



A wise critic recently said; “It must be an exceptional 
orchestra that can stay 6 months in the one ballroom.” 
We hate to brag, BUT take a peek at our record of 
successful business. 



OWEN FALLON 

AND HIS CALIFORNIANS 

NOW IN SECOND YEAR AT 

WILSON’S BALLROOM 

(Formerly Cinderella Roof) 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 


LOS ANGELES 

Established leaders of the past 
several weeks still hold their own 
in popular sales of sheet music, 
but a general arrangement of the 
followers is reflected, with “White 
Dove” from “The Rogue Song” 
making a surprise appearance in 
the best sellers. This is a number 
from the original “Gypsy Love 
from which “Rogue Song” was 
made. Here is the current line-up: 

1. “Springtime .in the Rockies” 
— Villa Moret. 

2. “Happy Days” — Ager, Yel- 
len & Bornstein. 

3. “Should I?”— Robbins. 

4. “With You”— Berlin. 

5. “There’s Danger in Your 
Eyes” — Berlin. 

6. “Cryin’ for the Carolines” — 
Remick. 

7. “White Dove” — Harms. 

8. “If I’m Dreaming” — Harms. 

9. “Woman in a Shoe” — Rob- 
bins. 

10. “Singing a Vagabond Song” 
— Santly. 

Right behind these in sales are: 
“Chant of the Jungle,” “What Is 
This Thing Called Love?” “The 
One I Love,” “When the Little 
Red Roses,” “When I’m Looking 
at You,” “Diet of Love” and 
“Cottage for Sale.” 

Recordings 

1. “Putting on the Ritz” — All 
recordings. 

2. “When I'm Looking at You” 
— (Tibbett) Victor. 

3. “Happy Days” — All record- 
ings. 

4. “Nobody’s Sweetheart” — 
(Whiteman) Columbia. 

5. “What Is This Thing Called 
Love?” (Reisman) Victor. 

6. “Only a Rose” — (Crooks) 
Victor. 

7. “Hanging on the Garden 
Gate” — Victor. 

8. “Woman in a Shoe” — All re- 
cordings. 

9. “Beside an Open Fireplace” 
— (Vallee) Victor. 

10. “Springtime in the Rockies” 
— ^Columbia. 

In good demand also are “When 
the Little Red Roses” and “Sing 
You Sinners.” 

SAN FRANCISCO 
In a new deal on sheet music 
“Springtime In the Rockies” again 
drew first position while the re- 
maining nine ditties were consider- 
ably shuffled about. First ten sell- 
ers are : 

1. “Springtime In the Rockies” 
— Villa Moret. 

2. “Happy Days” — Ager, Yel- 
len and Bornstein. 

3. “Cryin’ For the Carolines” 
— Remick. 

4. “Sh-ould I?” — Robbins. 

5. “Woman In the Shoe” — 
Robbins. 

6. “Kiss Me With Your Eyes” 
•Villa Moret. 

7. “With You” — Berlin. 

8. “Congratulations” — DeSylva, 
Brown and Henderson. 

9. “Chant of the Jungle” — Rob- 
bins. 

10. “Mona” — DeSylva, Brown 
and Henderson. 

Recordings 

1. “Springtime In the Rockies” 
-All. 

2. “Danger In Your Eyes, 
Cherie” — Harry Richman (Bruns- 
wick). 

3. “With You”— All. 

4. “Should I?” — Paul White- 
man (Columbia). 

5. “Happy Days” — Johnny Mar- 
vin (Victor). 

6. “Cryin’ For the Carolines” — 
Guy Lombardo (Columbia). 

7. “This Thing Called Love” — 
Leo Reisman (Victor). 

8. “Puttin’ On the Ritz” — Leo 
Reisman (Victor). 

9. “I’m On a Diet of Love”— 
George Olsen (Victor). 

10. “Song of the Islands” — All 


MAX BRADFIELD MADE 
M. C. AT FOX-COLORADO 


Max Bradfield has been installed 
as permanent orchestra leader in 
the Colorado Theatre, Pasadena. 
All Fanchon and Marco Ideas 
have premieres in this house. 
Bradfield is of F. and M.’s pio- 
neer masters - of - ceremonies and 
knows the game from the ground 
up. 



SAN FRANCISCO. April 3.— 
The new Paramount is setting its 
conductor, Don George, in with the 
kids. Organization of a kiddies’ 
club was completed last week with 
the youngsters attending a Satur- 
day morning show, where George 
is at the organ console accompany- 
ing the tots in the entertainment 
they provide by and for them- 
selves. 

Paramount management has is- 
sued a card to the kids admitting 
them ten times at IS cents a crack. 
At the end of the ten times they 
can bring a free guest to any one 
of the Granada shows by display- 
ing the card. 

George is one of the very few 
orchestra conductors who also 
knows his organ console. Until a 
few weeks ago he was house or- 
ganist when Publix brought Har- 
old Ramsay in from the East and 
made George conductor. 


ORDERS FROM ABROAD 

SAN DIEGO, April 3. — Man- 
aois Music Publishing Co. has 
just filled an order for 100 copies 
of their song, “Senorita” for Mon- 
aka Music House of Japan, and 
also is in receipt of a letter from 
Anton J. Benjamin, music pub- 
lisher of Germany, in which the 
latter asked permission to re- 
publish “Senorita” for his terri- 
tory. offering the firm a guaran- 
teed amount in advance besides a 
royalty on copies sold. 

DOING NIFTY TIE-UPS 


_A1 Burgess, working under the 
direction of Sig Bosley of the 
Robbins firm, has effected a num- 
ber of tie-ups with leading mer- 
chants, has placed 200 cards in 
gasoline stations exploiting “Kick- 
ing a Hole in the Sky,” and is 
having 500 cards distributed by 
grocery stores and markets ex- 
ploiting “Cooking Breakfast for 
the One I Love,” in which Ben 
Hur coffee gets a break. 

IS RADIO PIANIS'T 

Polly Hall, who was with the 
Villa Moret firm for a number 
of years, is now one of the studio 
pianists at KFI. 

WITH RED STAR 
Jack Reed, formerly in charge 
of the San Francisco Irving Ber- 
lin office, is now connected with 
the Red Star Music Co. in Los 
Angeles. 


M.C.II. KEPme 

yp MPID SIK 


The Music Corporation of Amer- 
ica is extending its enterprise by 
leaps and bounds, according to 
word received here from the East. 
Recent activities include: 

Jimmie Joy and his Orchestra, 
who for the past three seasons 
have been featured at the Brown 
Hotel, Louisville, opened at the 
Hotel Coronado, St. Louis, March 
28. The band also will broadcast 
over KMOX, and are recording 
exclusively for Brunswick. 

Bobby Meeker and his Orches- 
tra, who were booked into the Jef- 
ferson Hotel, St. Louis, for six 
weeks, have had their contract ex- 
tended until the summer season 
sets in. 

For the fifth consecutive season 
the management of the Steel Pier 
at Atlantic City has contracted 
with the M.C.A. for a series of 
orchestras. Those who will play 
under the M.C.A. bookings during 
the coming summer are Ted 
Weems, Jack Crawford, Wayne 
King, Phil Baxter. 

Eddie Neibaur and his Seattle 
Harmony Kings, who have been 
featured at the Trianon Ballroom, 
Chicago, for two years, have 
signed exclusively with the M.C.A. 

Emerson Gill and his Orchestra, 
who have bene featured at Cleve- 
land’s Show Boat in the Hollen- 
don Hotel, have also signed exclu- 
sively with M.C.A. They close at 
tlie Hollendon early this month, 
and start engagements at several 
hotels on the M.C..:\. circuit, re- 
turning to their former spot in the 
fall. 

Hogan Hancock and his Or- 
chestra, booked into Shadowland, 
San Antonio night club, for two 
weeks, have had their contract ex- 
tended to run until May 1. 


LIEBMAN IN S. F. 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
Harry Liebman, assistant general 
manager of DeSylva, Brown and 
Flenderson, was here this week 
visiting Lou Emmel, local repre- 
sentative for the music publishing 
firm. Mrs. Liebman accompanied 
him. 


PUBLISHING NUMBERS 

All numbers for the Pathe pic- 
ture, “Swing High,” are being 
published by Shapiro, Bernstein 
and Co. Included are “Happiness 
Over the Hill” and “Do You 
Think I Could Grow on You?” 


HAROLD 

HOWARD 

AND HIS 

ORCHESTRA 

B.B.B. CELLAR CAFE 
Hollywood, Calif. 


PLAYING OVER KOIN 


PORTLAND, Ore., April 3.— 
Warner Stone and his Capital City 
Orchestra are now being featured 
over station KOIN. 


OPENING IN DENVER 


SAN FRANCISCO. April 3.— 
Henry Halstead and his Orchestra, 
formerly at the St. Francis Hotel 
here, are opening at the Cosmo- 
politan Hotel in Denver. 

HAVE MUSIC COUNTER 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
H. Kress store has installed a 
sheet music counter in its Market 
Street headquarters, offering pop 
numbers at a 2S-cent tariff. 


GLEN BUCEY 

And His POM POM HI HATTERS 

With Ellis “Red” Thompson, sax; Jimmy Balderas, piano; Leo 
Hagan, trumpet; William Alexander, banjo and guitar; Russell 
Harrison, trombone, and Jean James, piano. 

Pom Pom Night Club, Hollywood Indefinite 


WILL PRIOR 

CONDUCTOR 

NEW STATE THEATRE, SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA 


TED HENKEL 


MUSICAL 

CONDUCTOR and 


PRESENTATION 

DIRECTOR 


CIVIC THEATRE 

Auckland, New Zealand 

Pit Orchestra of 30 - : - Stage Band of 20 


SATURDAY, APRIL 5, 1930 


INSIDE FACTS OF STAGE AND SCREEN 


PAGE THIRTEEN 


Orchestra Reviews 


Hot Licks 


(Continued from Page 12) 
Hotel in Phoenix sometime during 
April. The hotel does not plan 
to retain an orchestra this summer, 
so Lyol’s successor is not named. 
“Spike” is rumored going M. C. A. 
♦ * ♦ 

Harry Owens and his Orchestra 
will probably return to Los An- 
geles when the season ends at the 
Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix. The 
band has proved very popular with 
the Biltmore clientele and the 
Phoenix fans. 

* ♦ * 

Mike Sidell and his Orchestra 
are still holding forth at the Frolic 
Ballroom in Phoenix. 

• • • 

Joey Starr’s gang at the Ren- 
dezvous out at Mesa have been 
building up to good business. The 
band boasts seven arrangers, sing- 
ing trios, singles, quartets and 
whatnots. Bill and “Fuzz’ Mac- 
Cauley constitute the big end of 
the vocals and both boys have real 
sets _ of pipes. Ralph Maynard is 
playing piano and languishing for 
the bride he left in El Centro. 

* ♦ ♦ 

Phoenix is very proud O'! its 
new radio station, KTAR. Mod- 
ern and luxurious in every detail, 
the station is clicking big. It is 
said to be the best in the state of 
Arizona, and that it ranks well 
with the best in the country. 

♦ * * 

The Cottonwoods, the popular 
summer dance-place in Phoenix, is 
scheduled to open Wednesday, 
April 16. The management plans 
to make this a “Cottonwoods” 
summer. The grounds have been 
snapped up w'ith new lighting ef- 
fects throughout, bigger and bet- 
ter concession stands and parking 
features, and a greatly increased 
seating capacity constitute some 
of the innovations. Fred Perry 
and Clint Julian will furnish the 
words and. music and will be as- 
sisted by Ed Schroeder. Tom 
Donahue, Eddie Ramas, Walt Lee 
and Kay Robinson. And that line- 
up ought to make a darned good 
orchestra. 

♦ * * 

According to a story from 
Budapest, as carried by the In- 
ternational News Service, comes 
the information that one Frank 
Szekeres has perfected an instru- 
ment designed to eliminate drum- 
mers and saxophone players from 
jazz-orchestras. It is called the 
“Breakophon.” The new inven- 
tion is played like a piano (heav- 
en be praised) and has a saxo- 


ORGANISTS 


HERB 

KERN 

Organist-Master of Ceremonies 
FOX WEST COAST 
Long Beacb, Calif. 


RUDOLPH N. 

SCHRAEGER 

PREMIER ORGANIST 
Chinese Theatre, Hollywood 
INDEFINITE 


WM. (Billy) KNOX 

SOLO ORGANIST 

Fox Oakland Theatre 


VIC DE LORY 

That Croonlnsr Bass Player 
Now— LOEW’S STATE 
Los Angeles 

INDEFINITE 


jAy 

BCOWEC 

MASTER-OF-CEREMONIES 

FOX EL CAPITAN 

SAN FRANCISCO 


ADD MEN TO PRIES 

BAND AT ST. FRANCIS 

SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
Publix is augmenting the orches- 
tra at its St. Francis Theatre by 
four men, with the baton remain- 
ing in the hands of Larie de Pries. 

Heretofore the house has had 
only seven men under de Pries’ 
direction but with the total 
brought up to 11 the weekly con- 
certs will be featured even more 
than currently. 


HELP CHEST DRIVE 


OAKLAND, April 3.— The local 
branch of the San Francisco Mu- 
sicians’ Union, under the secre- 
taryship of George Price, has been 
taking an active part in the Com- 
munity Chest drive by donating 
the services of members for 45 
minutes daily. During the past 
week the following orchestras 
played for the Chest workers: 
Chuck Dutton, Hotel Oakland; Os- 
car Preston, R-K-O Orpheum; 
Jack Coale, Rose Room; Hermie 
King, Fox -Oakland; George 
Schultz, Neptune Beach; Reg Code, 
Athens Club; Ed Buckholtz, Dance- 
land; Charles Dring, Moose Club. 


BANDS AT BEACH 


OAKLAND. April 3. — Neptune 
Beach, Alameda, opened its sum- 
mer season this week. Lew Rey- 
nolds and his Orchestra and George 
Schultz and Band hold the music 
contracts for the resort. At the 
opening day’s festivities Jack 
Laughlan had the band for the 
ball game. 


AT SHRINE SHOW 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
Val Valente and his Roof Garden 
Orchestra are booked to play at 
the Sacramento Civic Auditorium 
next week for a Shriner show. 


NEW W. B. TEAM 


Joe Young and Harry Warren, 
composer and lyricist, who have 
just been signed by Warner Bros., 
are en route to the coast. 


phone and drums (with traps) at- 
tachment. All the noises of the 
modern jazz-band may be repro- 
duced. A Hungarian piano manu- 
facturer recognized the efficiency 
of the new instrument and started 
to produce and advertise them on 
a large scale. The jazz-musicians 
of Budapest were aroused to ac- 
tion and decided to break the ma- 
chine to pieces wherever it made 
its appearance. The first assault 
occurred in a Budapest cafe. The 
boys got together the following 
day and extended their exertions 
to Mr, (senor, herr, or signor — or 
whatever they use in Budapest) 
Szerkes and that gentleman moved 
himself to Vienna. He is now 
reported as dickering with Ameri- 
can business men in an effort to 
market his production in the Unit- 
ed States. So unless this instru- 
ment is terrible — and we hope it 
is — the Breakophon is going to 
bust up a lot of small jazz-com- 
binations in these parts. Our only 
hope is a wage scale that will be 
equal to the salaries of the dis- 
placed members. 


McELROY’S SPANISH 
BALLROOM BAND 

SEATTLE 
(Reviewed March 29) 

Cole McElroy’s aggregation of 
10 musicians stand in high favor 
with terpsichorean enthusiasts of 
the Northwest. The band has been 
playing to good houses locally for 
the past two years and is still go- 
ing strong. 

Bus Greene, Bob Dickinson and 
Jack Schulmerick are in the sax 
section, each man doubling on 
clarinet, and Dickinson, in addi- 
tion, playing fiddle and Schulmer- 
ick, trumpet. The brass section 
embraces Fred Morelock and Don 
Anderson, trumpets, and Spec 
Thomas, trombone. This trio also 
team for mellophone solos. Tom 
Curtis is heard on both the Sousa- 
phone and bass viol. Syl Halper- 
in, at the piano, is leader and ar- 
ranger, while George Eichorn 
handles the tympani and drums in 
addition to being featured in vo- 
cals. Johnny Sylvester, on the 
accordion, and Ted Muller, mas- 
ter-of-ceremonies, complete the 
band’s personnel, that has been to- 
gether, in the main, for years. 

The boys have perfect rhythm 
and handle themselves in master- 
ful fashion. Each boy sings well 
and has plenty of personality. 

Interpolated with the band’s ren- 
ditions of all the late pops, the 
boys used several comedy bits that 
were good. Of these, “Sing, You 
Sinners,” as arranged by Halperin 
and Eichorn, was cleverly done. 
Mullen sangs the first chorus, with 
the trio from the reed section of- 
fering the third chorus after some 
hot orchestral licks. A clever bit 
of satirical fun, the spiritualistic 
rendition of “Great Day,” clicked 
nicely with the fans, the entire as- 
semblage stopping their hoofing to 
listen. Fredffie Morelock and Ted 
Mullen did a neat bit of tin-type 
work with “Never Throw Stones 
at Your Mother,” in which Syl- 
vester offered some fast accordion 
accompaniment. 

Mullen and Dickinson had a nice 
satire on Chic Sales with “The 
Robin,” Dickinson supplying the 
comedy fiddle work and Mullen 
doing the vocals. 

Straight dance stuff was un- 
furled with verve and individual- 
ity. Flalperin obviously works 
hard over the stock arrangements 
and his efforts get results. Of the 
singing members of the band, 
George Eichorn has a voice that 
clicks. 


CLUB VICTOR 

SEATTLE 
(Reviewed March 27) 

Vic Meyers and his Columbia 
Recording Band furnish the music 
for this spot, one of the classiest 
here. Ten men render the latest 
pops in super-symphonic style that 
clicks with the patrons. Personnel 
of the unit embraces William Bul- 
lard, piano; Robert Gordon, Dan- 
ny Gann and Joe Adams, reeds; 
Glenn Atchison and Billie Stewart, 


trumpets; A1 Thompson, trombone; 
Walt Haines, string bass; Freddie 
Huff, drums; Frank Spencer, banjo, 
and Billy Ulman, vocals. Cann 
doubles on the violin. 

Entertainment features Ulman, 
who doubles over from Owen 
Sweeten’s Band at the Fox Thea- 
tre. This lad, who has been titled 
the “Rudy Vallee of the West” by 
local fans, is a sure-fire bet when- 
ever he picks up the megaphone. 
Working in front of the band, he 
scored neatly with his warbling of 
“It's Because,” 7If I Can’t Have 
our Love,” “What Do I Care?” “I 
Love You, Believe Me, I Love 
You,” “Man From the South,” 
Melancholy Baby,” and a host of 
others. 

Carolynne Snowden is currently 
featured as the only floor enter- 
ta'iner. Fler first was “Sing, You 
Sinners.” She was in nice voice 
and sang the tune to a hot orches- 
tral accompaniment. She went into 
a fast tap routine that was grace- 
fully executed, with some dark- 
town strutting interpolated. Her 
second number was a character of- 
fering, “Louisiana,” for which she 
dressed as a southern mammy. 

After a comedy entrance for this 
one she sang the low-down tune 
while seated on a chair, following 
this with a shuffle. A big hand 
called for an encore and she did 
“What Did I Do to Be So Black 
and Blue,” real low-down and hot. 
She tapered the turn off with some 
pretty eccentric steps. 

Carolynne’s final number was 
“When You’re Smilin’,” a poor 
choice for her type. Her fast tap 
dance to a pair of choruses was 
clever and drew hefty applause. 
“Flandy Man,” her encore, was a 
classic. The orchestra, with mu- 
sical gags, opened this one, after 
which Miss Snowden gave a plen- 
ty-hot rendition of the tune, fol- 
lowing it with a fast eccentric rou- 
tine of steps. She begged off after 
a pair of bows. 

The entire show goes over the 
air by remote control via KJR. 


WITH HARMS 


Mickey Hester is now connected 
with the Harms office, which is 
under the direction of Artie 
Mehlinger. 


CHANGE DISTRIBUTION 


Distribution of Brunswick phono- 
graph records is no longer being 
made through the bowling and 
billiard branches of the Brunswick 
company, but is being turned over 
to leading music wholesalers 
throughout the country whose or- 
ganization is believed to be better 
adaped to sales promotion in the 
trade. Western Radio of Califor- 
nia, Inc., is the new distributor 
for Southern California, and a San 
Francisco distributor will be ap- 
pointed shortly. Leading Bruns- 
wick recordings now current are 
“Happy Days” with Charles King, 
and “Cherie” with Harry Richman. 


AT HASTINGS PARK 


VANCOUVER, April 3. — Phil 
Baxter, author of “Piccolo Pete,” 
and his Texas Tommies, open at 
the Pavilion, Happyland, Hastings 
Park, on April S. With this band 
of 11 pieces in, the dance pavilion 
will be plugged heavily this sea- 
son. 


HERTZ LEAVING 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
After 15 years of consecutive serv- 
ice, Alfred Hertz this week takes 
his final bow as conductor of the 
San Francisco Symphony follow- 
ing his resignation tendered last 
year. No successor has been 
named. 


ON VACATION 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
Wilt Gunzendorfer, who has the 
orchestra at the Hotel Whitcomb, 
is vacationing in Los Angeles this 
week. 


READYING FOR OPENING 

SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.— 
The Tivoli Theatre, formerly the 
Columbia before Erlanger opened 
the new house by that name, has 
had a Neon sign erected and is 
being prepared for an opening 
shortly. 


“Bonita” “In Heaven^ 
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PAGE FOURTEEN 


INSIDE FACTS OF STAGE AND SCREEN 


SATURDAY, APRIL S, 1930 


BOB HOPE 


‘KEEP SMILING” 


RKO’ing This Year 


VERY HAPPY 


Uaudevitte and *Tresentations 


MILLION DOLLAR 

LOS ANGELES 
(Reviewed March 27) 

The question, "Does the public 
want vaudeville?” would seem to 
have been answered definitely in 
the affirmative when Noodles 
Fagan bounced out on the first 
show of the new vaude policy of 
the Million Dollar Theatre and 
asked the customers if they liked 
the idea of flesh-and-blood artists 
again. The result was a Niagara 
of applause, repeated at every 
show. 

Fagan acted as m. c., announc- 
ing each act. The six-act bill 
opened with the Three Freehands, 
equilibrists, who goaled ’em from 
first curtain with thrillers, espe- 
cially on the pole. 

Geodge Yeoman and Lizzie in 
“A Radio Broadcasting Station” 
did very little broadcasing, just 
using the set as a background for 
a line of wisecracks. The act 
garnered a lot of laughs and more 
than pleased the customers. 

Empire Four Quartette held trey 
spot and registered, offering three 
novelty numbers for good cmedy 
returns. 

The Hadji Ali act gaped the 
customers, the water swallowing, 
spouting and fireblowing stunts 
going over for a panic. A full 
stage act, well dressed and 
handled. 

Noodles Fagan had the next-to- 
closing, chanting his usual verses 
with people in the audience for his 
subjects, and daughter, Mary, com- 
ing on for her stepping number, 
then both singing old time songs. 
They had no trouble selling their 
time-tried stuff to this first night 
audience. 

Sonia closed with her Revue In- 
ternationale. A full stage act with 
a European setting, pianist and 
cellist on stage, assisted by band 
in pit; pair 6f male hoofers and 
Sonia, a husky girl, bigger than 
average for this type of dancing. 
Her Grenadier number went best, 
but the audience showed enthusi- 
asm for the whole act. 

Screen fare was Paramount’s 
“Dangerous Paradise,” with Nancy 
Carroll. Biz was good. 

Yeates. 


RKO 

LOS ANGELES 
(Reviewed March 27) 

A four-act bill opened by the 6 
American Belfords in their tum- 
bling and human foot juggling; 
swift, smooth and went over big. 

The comedy songologue of Lor- 
raine Howard and Florence New- 
ton occupied the deuce spot and 
failed to hold the enthusiasm gen- 
erated by the Belfords. They sang 
“I Get the Blues When It Rains” 
and “Wedding Bells, When You 
Ring For Me” mixed with patter. 


fair to middling; voices poor; clos- 
ing with medley of old numbers, 
more patter and a yodel; no call- 
back at this matinee. 

Teck Murdock filled the trey 
spot with a brand new dressing 
and treatment for his tab “O. 
Henry” and the crowd went for it. 
The love racket practiced by the 
chap with a girl for each night in 
the week, with his turning out to 
be a married man after all, and 
the slick scene changes and per- 
sonality of the girls, rated the act 
high in entertainment value. Sets 
were framed panelwise in a black 
curtain a short street scene be- 
tween each interior gave chance 
for the quick change. Murdock’s 
long legs came into action fre- 
quently with the girls in hoofing 
numbers, and there were a pair of 
songs, “Nobody’s Using Them 
Now” and “You’re Just the Girl 
For Me.” It paid off big. 

Bill Robinson, headliner, fol- 
lowed this big act with his single 
in one, and how he held the spotl 
He opened with a gag or two 
then went into his tap dancing, re- 
vealing all the artistry and ability 
that made him a headliner. Per- 
sonality plus finish won applause 
all through the act, with a big 
cheer to close. 

Picture was Radio’s “Delightful 
Rogue,” with Rod La Rocque. 

Yeates. 


ORPHEUM 

SEATTLE 
(Reviewed March 30) 

Four acts of vaude, the standard 
fare here now, featured Natacha 
Natova. 

Tiny Burnett and his R-K-0- 
lians preceded the stage show with 
a medley of love tunes that were 
well done. The group included 
“What Is That Thing Called 
Love?” “You Made Me Love You,” 
“Lover Come Back to Me” and 
“I Can’t Give You Anything But 
Love. Baby.” Strong’s interpola- 
tions on the organ enlivened the 
orchestral presentation. 

Tom Lomas and Company (8) 
opened the bill with an English bit 
of comedy that started weak but 
built into an unusual novelty that 
scored heavily. After some bur- 
lesque comedy, staged in three be- 
fore a barnyard drop, the troupe 
did a routine on stitlts that was a 
whiz. Six people on the elongated 
legs paraded around in military 
garb and formation in a turn that 
was ingenious. Each pair of stilts 
was larger than the other, the sex- 
tet ranging from ten to twenty-five 
feet in height. The fern in the act 
sang a bit, “The Big Parade,” to 
precede this finale. 

Tyler Mason was strong in the 
deuce spot for 15 minutes. He 


WILLS^UNNINGHAM 

STUDIO OF DAKCING 

7016 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVABD GLADSTONE 9602 

Professionals Taugbt by Professionals 
Boutlnes Created and Perfected for Single, Double and Ensemble 
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Walter Wills Theatrical Employment Agency 

Talent Booked for Pictures, Vaudeville, Production. Olubs 


WANTED — Acts Suitable for Vaudeville, Picture House 
Presentations, Clubs and Talkies 

AL WAGER 

(Artists’ Representative) 

221 Loew’s State Bldg. Phone VAndike 3619 Los Angelesy Calif. 


Meiklejohn Bros. 

ASSOCIATED VAUDEVILLE MANAGERS 
Fourth Floor, Spreckels Bldg. 

PhouMi 714 So. HiU St. 

TRinity 2217, TRinity 221« LOS ANGELES 

VAUDEVILLE AND PICTURE HOUSE 
ENGAGEMENTS AVAILABLE 
FOR STANDARD ACTS 


worked blackface in one, starting 
out with a few fast gags that 
clicked and then going into 
“Singing in the Rain.” Mason has 
a nice tenor voice, plenty of per- 
sonality and showmanship. Some 
more gags and he went into 
“Roses of Picardy.” He followed 
with “Waiting at the End of the 
Road,” done equally as well as the 
first two. Trying to beg off with 
a comedy recitation, he was called 
back and sang “Mistakes,” again 
getting over forte. 

Johnny Sully and Muriel Thom- 
as worked in one for twelve min- 
utes with a routine of hokum 
titled “It and That.” They’ve got 
some new gags that are sure-fire 
and know how to sell ’em. After 
some repartee, Sully did a song 
gag on “Wild Irish Rose,” with 
a plant working from the house 
for lots of laughter. He tapered 
it off with a fast bit of tap hoofing 
that smacked of the genuine. After 
this the fern entered in abbreviated 
garb and the duo unfurled what 
they hail as a new jig, “The St. 
Louis Rhythm.” It sold. A ra- 
dio station black-out bit closed 
turn. 

Natacha Nattova tied things up 
with a IS minute routine to close 
the show. She has three men 
with her who are of material as- 
sistance . Her first offering was 
titled “The Kiss of Love and 
Death,” divided into two scenes, 
“Valse Variations” and “Agitato.” 
The setting was exotic, embracing 
a purple eye with a rich-looking 
double stairway the only scenery. 
Both dances were done with grace. 
G. Banjou offered a flute solo dur- 
ing the intermission. His bit, 
done with his head protruding 
from a hole in the curtain, was 
“Chant Du Rossignol,” a classic 
that he did exceptionally well. The 
act was brought to a close with 
a futuristic bit of dance, “Ma- 
chinismo.” For this turn, the set- 
piece downstage was changed to 
resemble machinery. The motif 
of the dance carried out this me- 
chanical idea, and displayed grace, 
precision and exactness on the 
part of Miss Nattova and her 
three partners. The dance is a 
quadruple adagio. Heavy applause. 

Screen attraction was “The 
Love Racket.” 

Jean. 


GOLDEN GATE 
SAN FRANCISCO 
(Reviewed March 28) 

Almost always a capacity house 
at this, the only vaude theatre in 
town. With average program pic- 
tures hardly to be credited for all 
or most of the draw, it’s natural 
conclusion that vaude is responsi- 
ble for pulling in most of the busi- 
ness and especially so with a good 
show like this. 

Lime Trio opened. Featured 
rubber member of the group has 
plenty _ of credit coming to him 
for his excellent contortionistic 
work and the manner in which his 
aides throw and bend him around. 

In the _ deuce Adela Verne, con- 
cert pianist, opened with her own 
composition dedicated to Lindy 
and one for which R-K-0 is in- 
stituting a name contest. Number 
over okay, and then she did a 
classic_ that drew heavy applause, 
necessitating an encore. Excel- 
lent piano work. 

With a bag full of smart cracks, 
some of ’em broad and some of 
’em pretty sophisticated, Bob Hope 
had no trouble at all scoring with 
the hoke-loving mob. An unbilled 
miss helped him out for a few 
minutes and then Hope worked 
right into the following act, Harry 
Webb’s Entertainers. Webb, char- 
acter comedian, has a band of 10 
men, two featured fern dancers 
and a colored boy who hoofs. All 
worked up into excellent, fast-mov- 
ing entertainment with Hope m. 
c.’ing it and Webb working his 
comedy stuff throughout. 

Claude Sweeten and his RKO- 
lians had a hotter than usual ver- 
sion of “Tio San,” with members 
of the orchestra being spot-lighted 
in solo choruses for heavy re- 


turns. Picture was Columbia’s 
“Murder On the Roof.” 

Bock. 


LOEW’S STATE 

LOS ANGELES 
(Reviewed March 28) 

The Singers Midgets bring as 
delightfully a varied act as usual, 
moving with pep. well dressed and 
a league leader for the kiddies. 

The entertainment includes 
songs and dances, both solo and 
ensemble, strong man stuff, an act 
by three of the best trained ele- 
phants in captivity, etc., etc. 

Due to the familiarity of show 
business with the Midgets, a re- 
view at length is not necessary. It 
is A-1 stuff for youngsters, with 
plenty of kick for adults as well. 

F. A. H. 


FOX EL CAPITAN 

SAN FRANCISCO 
(Reviewed March 30) 

Deiro was billed all over the 
town for the week’s show, the 
heavy publicity on this premier 
accordionist bringing them into 
this house while other theatres in 
town suffered from the hot 
weather. Five heavy shows this 
Sunday and each of them packed. 
Recently refurned from a tour of 
England, Deiro was accorded more 
publicity and exploitation than any 
other feature El Cap. has ever 
had, and one peep at the lineups 


outside the theatre showed the 
heavy draw this chap is here. 

Stage show got under way with 
Frank O’Leary and Tessie singing 
“Year From Georgene,” then 
stepped out of the line to chant 
“A Darn Fool Woman Like Me,” 
displaying plenty of personality 
and a cute voice. 

In the second week of the band’s 
popluarity contest. Jay Brower in- 
troduced Bob Kimic, who led the 
boys through a nice arrangement 
of “Can’t We Be Friends?” the 
embryo m. c. tossing in a muted 
trumpet solo and a vocal chorus 
for good measure. Extra heavy 
returns that warranted an encore. 
Connor Twins on to sing “Chant 
of the Jungle” and “Following 
You” and to add a little sophisti- 
cated comedy that was over the 
customers’ heads. Jay Brower, 
Pic Smith and Lowell Hawk in 
the $1 to pay a $2 debt blackout 
got the laughs. Frank O’Leary 
next on to sing “Love, Your Spell 
Is Everywhere” in good voice. 

Building him up with a neat 
introduction, Brower then brought 
on Deiro who started off his offer- 
ings with “Romeo and Juliet” ov- 
erture, displaying an accordion 
technique second to none. Fol- 
lowed with “Waters of the Min- 
netonka,” “Serenade,” and closed 
with “Lx)ver Come Back To Me,” 
only to be returned for two en- 
( Continued on Page IS) 



LYNN YOST 

Artists 'Manager 

Telephone ORegon 5071 

Address: /Bank of Hollywood Bldg., 
Corner Hollywood Blvd. and Vine St. 


c 


Artists and Acts Register For 
Theatrical Bookings, Orchestras and 
Qub Entertiunment 


IRA F. GAY AGENCY 


206 Majestic Theatre B uilding 
845 South Broadway 
FA 3421 Los Angeles 


SATURDAY, APRIL S, 1930 


INSIDE FACTS OF STAGE AND SCREEN 


PAGE FIFTEEN 


HARRY WEBB ENTERTAINERS 

REGARDS FROM WHITE-FACED HARRY AND HIS GANG 


Legitimate 


(Continued from Page 11) 
all details of business, lighting, 
sound effects and scenic settings; 


Fanchon and Marco 
Route List of “Ideas” 


casting excellent and individual 
portrayals interesting. Exceedingly 
clever was the curtain of the first 
act with its modern groupings, 
cross-fire conversations but with 
essential lines standing out clearly. 

Especially creditable was the 
work of Martha Dean, wife and 
chimney impressario. Her work 
dominated. The part of the hus- 
band and owner of “Spindrift” 
was taken capably by Joseph 
Sauers, and the son by Robert 
Young, the goodness of whose 
work, however, faded somewhat as 
the play progressed. Stuart Buch- 
anan proved sufficiently capable as 
the playwright, as did Gypsy 
O’Brien as the mistress of the 
sculptor and wife of the son. 

Gilmor Brown, director, ap- 
peared imposingly as the bearded 
sculptor, and the other parts were 
taken competently by Lisa Thomp- 
son, Eugene J. Sharkey, Tirzah 
Daines, Charles Levison, Esther 
Saenger, James Hawks and 
Blanche Phillips Coolidge. The 
settings were produced under the 
supervision of F. Carl Huxley. 
The production is scheduled to 
close April 9. 

Y eat es. 


^Presentations 


(Continued from Page 14) 
cores, “Springtime In the Rock- 
ies” and another pop number. Had 
to give ’em a talk before he could 
get away. 

It was tough to follow this, but 
here Brower had another of his 
nut band numbers that are always 
a cinch in this house. _ It was a 
story told in music with George 
Munson and Pic Smith playing 
the leads and it clicked for an en- 
core. Finale had all on stage 
warbling "Lady Luck.” 

“Lone Star Ranger” (Fox) was 
the picture. Mel Hertz at the or- 
gan. 

Hal. 


FOX OAKLAND 
OAKLAND 
(Reviewed March 26) 

This was Hermie King’s 74th 
week as m. c. here, an endurance 
record that is equalled only by 
King’s rise to popularity and his 
holding it. He’s more popular 
now than he was in his tenth or 
twentieth week and, as at this 
show, the customers ate out of his 
hand when one of his specialties 
came around. 

Sandwiched in this Fanchon and 
Marco “Sunshine Idea” King had 
a piano offering that was a knock- 
out. Bill Christenson, house prop 
man, fixed up the Knabe for Her- 
mie in a peach of a color job 
that looked like a million bucks 
from the front, and on it Hermie 
played “Sextette from Lucia” with 
one hand, following that with a 
medley of pop tunes. Easily en- 
cored. 

Line girls in “Sunshine Idea” 
were its outstanding figure. In ad- 
dition to good hoofing the girls 
juggled a mean set of balls and 
later, in a military routine, swung 
a nasty set of batons to far out- 
shine any of the stars of the show 
with the possible exception of 
Richard Wally who was respon- 
sible for the girls’ juggling techni- 
que and who juggled billiard balls 
and cues for his share of the 
opera. 

Arline Langan and Norman Sel- 
by in dance numbers and Barnum 
and Bailey in their familiar song 
and banjo offering, Vince Silk with 
a rather weak monologue embrac- 
ing a lot of old material, and 
Mary Lou, working blackface and 
then straight in two hoofing offer- 
ings, completed the show. 

Picture was William Haines in 
“The Girl Said No.” Billy Knox 
was at the organ. 

Hal. 


Following is the Fanchon ana Marco 
Ideas route schedule, with the openm/\^ 
dates, all of the current month, in pa- 
renthesis besides the name of the town: 

liOS AKOEliES (3) 

Loew*s State 
“Smiles’* Idea 
Castleton & Mack 
Eddie Hill & Eva Thornton 

SAN DIEGO <3) 

Pox Theatre 

The Famous Singers Midgets 

LONG BEACH (3) 

West Coast Tneatre 
' ‘Gyp Gyp Gypsy’ ’ Idea 
Chaz Chase George Prise 

Frank Evers and Greta Jose Gonzales 
Jeanne Alexandria 
Jose Gonzalez 

HOLLYWOOD (3) 

Egyptian Theatre 

‘ ‘Changes’ ’ Idea 
Doc Baker and Eva Mandell 
With Muriel Gardner 

Art Hadley Dave Le Winter 

12 Broadway Beauties 

PEESNO (3-6) 

Wilson Theatre 
“Coral” Idea 

Maurice & Vincent Frank Due 

The Royal Samoans La Petite Marie 

SAN JOSE (6-9) 

California Theatre 
“Coral” Idea 

Maurice & Vincent Frank Due 

The Royal Samoans La Petite Marie 

SAN PRANOISOO (4) 

Pox Tneatre 

“Broadway Venuses” Idea 
Mel Klee and 16 New York Beauty 
Winners 

Aerial Bartletts Wells & Winthrop 

Freda Sullivan 

OAKLAND (4) 

Pox Theatre 
“Skirts’ ’ Idea 

Neal Castagnoli Ruth Silver 

Julia Curtiss Up In the Air Girls 

SALEM. ORE. (5-6) 

Elsinore Theatre 
“Marble” Idea 

The Harris Trio Roy Smoot 

FIoBelle & Charlie A1 and Jack Rand 
Georgene and Henry Francia 

Hector and Hig GanS 

PORTLAND (3) 

Broadway Theatre 

“Sunshine** Idea 

Bailey & Barnum Richard Wally 

Vince Silk Mary Lou 

Arline Langan and Norman Selby 

SEATTLE, WASH. (3) 

Fifth Avenue Theatre 
“Eyes” Idea 

Don Carrol Six Candrevas 

Paul Olsen Bob and Ula Buroff 
Keo, Yoki and Toki 

SPOKANE, WASH. (3) 

Post Street Theatre 
“Trees” Idea 

Naynons Birds Mavis and Ted 

Terrell & Hanley Esther Campbell 

Christal Levine and Ted Reicard 

GREAT FALLS, MONT. (5-6) 

Grand Theatre 
“Peasant” Idea 

Diehl Sisters General Ed Lavine 

Johnson & Duker June Worth 

Belcher Dancers 

BUTTE, MONT. (3) 

Fox Theatre 
“Manila Bound' * Idea 
Harry & Frank Seamon Stella Royal 

Samuel Lopez Romero Family 

DENVER, OOLO. (3) 

Tabor Grand 
‘‘Overtures’* Idea 

Edison and Gregory Louise Manning 
Toots Novella Huff and Huff 

Helen Hille 

ST. LOUIS. MO. (4) 

Pox Theatre 
“Desert** Idea 

Ed and Morton Beck Muriel Stryker 
Cropley and Violet Manuel Lopes 
Oarla Torney Girls 


FOX T. & D. 

OAKLAND 
(Reviewed March 26) 

This first-run Fox house fea- 
tures Peter Brescia and his concert 
orchestra in regular spotlight of- 
ferings of merit, the current show 
having the group in selections from 
"Maytime.” 

Brescia, conducting the orches- 
tra of 10 men, is a good-looking 
young chap with a nice appear- 
ance and creating a favorable im- 
pression on his audience. It’s ap- 
parent that he knows how to con- 
duct and he gets the most out of 
bis gang. 

At the organ was Baron Hart- 
sough, whose console interpolations 
considerably aided the overture. 

Feature picture was Paramount’s 
“Roadhouse Nights.” 

Hal. 


ALLES PRINT 

MA 1681 -224 E. 4th St., Los Angeles- MA 1682 


MILWAUKEE, WIS. (4) 
Wisconzin Theatre 
“Ivory” Idea 

Pour High Hatters Hy Meyer 

Betty Lou Webb Peggy Carse 

Goetz and Duffy 

DETROIT, MICH. (4) 

Fox Theatre 

“Uniforms” Idea 

Armand & Perez Ruth Hamilton 

Sylvia Shore and Helen Moore 
Joy Brothers 

BUFFALO, N. Y. (6) 

Lafayette Theatre 

“Carnival Russe” Idea 
Countess Sonia Alex Sherer Bekefi 

Russian Sunrise Trio Sam Linfield Co. 

WORCESTER, MASS. (5) 

Palace Theatre 
“Let’s Pretend” Idea 
Till you & Rogers Florence Forman 

12^ Cheney ' Jimmy Hadreas 

George Green Rita Lane 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. (6) 

Palace Theatre 
' ‘Black and Gold’ ’ Idea 
Four Kemmys Arnold Grazer 

Maxine Hamilton Lee Wilmot 

HARTFORD. CONN. (6) 

Oapltol Theatre 
“Jazz Temple” Idea 

Wally Jackson Sylvia Doree 

Van De Velde Troupe Gus Elnore 
Nora Schiller 

NEW HAVEN. CONN. (6) 

Palace Theatre 
“In Green” Idea 

Born and Lawrence Moran and Weston 
Frankly n Record Doris Nierly 
Way Watts and Arminda 

BRIDGEPORT, CONN. (6) 

Palace Theatre 
“Far East” Idea 

Frank Stever Helen Pachaud 

M. Sanami & Co. Ruth Kadamatsu 
Joan Hardcastle 

WATERBURY, CONN. (6-8) 

Palace Theatre 
“Arts in Taps” Idea 
Myrtle Gordon Johnny Plank 

Rodney & Gould Eddie Lewis 

A1 & Hal Brown & Willa 

Jeanne MacDonald 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. (4) 

Fox Theatre 
“Accordion” Idea 

Burt & Lehman Theo. Ss Katya 

Nat Spector Mary Price 

Arnold Hartman 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. (4) 

Fox Theatre 
“Types’* Idea 

Trado Twins Harold Stanton 

Carlena Diamond 

WASHINGTON, D. 0. (6) 

Fox Theatre 
“Kisses** Idea 
Joe & Jane McKenna 
Will Oowan Mabel & Marcia 

E Flat Four Mitzi Mayfair 

Helen Aubrey Dave Hacker 

Wallen & Barnes 

ATLANTA, GA. (7) 

Fox Theatre 
“Baby Songs” Idea 
Penny Pennington Rose Valyda 

Pearl Hoff Alene & Evans 

MIAMI. OKLA. (2-3) 

Majestic Theatre 

“Hollywood Studio Girls” 

Three Gobs Chas. Rozelle 

Lorris & Fermine Miles & Perlee 
John Vale 

TULSA, OKLA. (4-6) 

Orpheum Theatre 
“Hollywood Studio Girls” Idea 
Three Gobs Miles & Perlee 

Chas. Rozelle John Vale 

Lorria & Fermine 

OKLAHOMA CITY (7-10) 

“Hollywood Studio Girls” 

Three Gobs Chas. Rozelle 

Lorris & Fermine Miles & Perlee 
John Vale 


FOX THEATRE 

SEATTLE 

(Reviewed March 28) 

Owen Sweeten and the band 
boys had a series of numbers on 
tap for this week which got over 
nicely, and which gave all sections 
of the group adequate chance to 
display their wares to good advan- 
tage. 

To strike the motif of the music, 
the pit was made up as an oriental 
temple, very effectively adding to 
the general classiness of the offer- 
ings. 

The pit arose with the band 
playing an oriental number. When 
this was over, to good applause. 
Sweeten had a novelty in making 
his announcements to the strains 
of a low obligato from the violin 
section. 

Next number was “The Rogue 
Song,’’ used to plug the coming of 
that picture. It was put across in 
showmanlike manner. 

“Crying For the Carolines” was 
a short and snappy third offering, 
with a trio from the reed section 
landing with a vocal chorus. 

Dale Claggett and his trombone 
were the stars of the next, “Blue 
Is the Night,” and a forte finish 


brought a big hand. 

Sweeten soloed “Kashmiri Song” 
on his trumpet, muted, with the 
boys humming accompaniment ef- 
fectively. Ray Watkins had some 
pretty bell work interpolated. 
Sweeten always is a payoff with 
his offerings, and this one clicked 
as strong as usual. 

Sid. 


CASINO THEATRE 
SAN FRANCISCO 
(Reviewed March 30) 

As usual, Ackerman & Harris 
offered a pleasing stage show. The 
Nell Harding girls opened with 
a tambourine dance to “Poet and 
Peasant” overture. Jacqueline 
Brunea, big fav at this house, vo- 
calized a Spanish number hitting 
plenty of high C’s and scoring 
heavily. Girls did a jockey num- 
ber and Sylvia & Clemence ren- 
dered a song double bringing in 
strong returns denoting their pop- 
ularity in this house. 

Bert LaMarr in a comedy con- 
tortion turn got across nicely. 
Duke Tehaney sang “With You.” 
Had nice voice but was too con- 
fidential with orchestra. Girls 
joined in chorus. Nearing Sisters 
in a medley of old-time numbers 
took an encore and did another 
harmony number in which one of 
the girls sang an old-time ditty 
while the other cleverly harmon- 
ized in modern style. Clemence 
warbled “Ain’t Misbehavin’ ” and 
nearly stopped the show. Girls 
followed with military tap number 
on stools. 

Joe Williams, colored hoofer do- 
ing a loose jointed tap number, 
displayed a lot of dancing and 
was forced to encore. Big finale 
with Tehaney singing “Dancing 
Butterflies” and girls in a butter- 
fly routine with two of them being 
suspended in mid-air. Better than 
average show at this house. 

Nifty scenic effects were the 
creation of Buck Theall. 

Picture was Fox’s “Seven Faces.” 
Joe Livingstone and his Orchestra 
were in the pit. 

Oakley. 


FIFTH AVENUE 

SEATTLE 

(Reviewed March 31) 

Jackie Souders and the house 
Band, in the pit, opened the 
“Trees” Idea with a hot rendition 
of “Chant , of the Jungle.” Heavy 
brass opened the tune, followed 
by pretty string work. Bill Wood- 
bury unfurled some hot licks on 
the trumpet, after which a trom- 
bone trio, Jackie, Earl Kelly and 
Cy Woodward, played a chorus 
with unmuted horns. This feature 
was well done and pretty. Ted 
Reicard, with the show, warbled 
a chorus pleasingly as he came up 
the lift with the organ. Betty 
Shilton was seated at the con- 
sole, providing the background for 
the accompaniment. Another hot 
chorus, with Betty featured at the 
organ, preceded _ a forte finish. A 
big hand for this one. 

'The rise of the curtain for the 
stage show revealed a tree drop 
set in three. _ Esther Campbell 
whistled as Reicard and Christal 
Lavine sang the themie, “Trees.” 
The drop was divided into four 
curtained sections from which 
came the teams exemplifying vari- 
ous trees. These were “Under the 
Shade of the Old Apple Tree,” 
for which a gal toe danced; “Un- 
der the Bamboo Tree,” revealing 
a pair of femme South Sea Island 
wigglers; “Under _ the Sheltering 
Palms,” with Mavis and Ted per- 
forming some classy adagio tricks, 
and “The Trail of the Lonesome 
Pine,” with a pair of femmes doing 


a routine of flip-flops. Reicard and 
Miss Lavine sang each of the 
tunes. The remaining seven line 
girls were on in big plumage for 
a parade routine, after which they 
formed a pretty picture, the cen- 
tral figures of which were Mavis 
and Ted in a lifting pose, to close 
the opening ensemble. 

Jimmy Fawcett followed with 
some clever eccentric acrobatic 
work that was neatly executed 
and clicked. Terrell and Hanley 
followed with a lot of comedy 
acrobatics that got the laughs. 
They tapered off their turn with 
a legitimate lift from the floor. 
For the following scene, two line 
girls came on for a tap routine 
as the curtain arose to present a 
puppet illusion. Reicard and his 
partner sang while the girls went 
through a nice dancing routine. 

Next followed Nayon’s Birds, 
employing much the same layout 
as when in vaudeville. Nayonand 
his wife have an interesting act. 
The pay-off is Anyd, cockatoo, 
who displays almost human intel- 
ligence with his work at arithme- 
tic. This is clever, and gets the 
laughs and applause. 

The finale had Mavis and Ted, 
whose routine had obviously been 
clipped. They were on for some 
fast and graceful adagio tricks as 
Reicard and Miss Lavine sang 
“Underneath the Weeping Wil- 
low Tree.” Five ropes were low- 
ered against the back drop, on 
which five girls worked first and 
then the entire line. The adagio 
pair continued their good work 
until the end, with Reicard again 
singing the theme song. “Trees.” 

Screen feature was “The Golden 
Calf.” 

Frog. 


WILBUR GUEST STAR 


SAN FRANCISCO, April 13.— 
Guy Bates Post opens April 7 for 
a three weeks’ engagement as 
guest star with the Richard Wil- 
bur Players at the Liberty The- 
atre. Honolulu. Post goes to the 
islands direct from St. Louis, 
where he has just completed a 
run. In Honolulu Post will do 
“The Masquerader,” “The Play’s 
the Thing” and “Her Friend, the 
King.” Lillian Kimbal Cooper, 
Post’s leading lady, will be with 
him. 


ON LONG CONTRACT 


Wynne Gibson, Broadway com- 
edienne, has been placed under 
long-term contract by Radio Pic- 
tures. Her first assignment will 
be a leading role opposite Jack 
Mulhall in “The Fall Guy.” She 
has been in Hollywood for eight 
months. 


SIMPSON WITH ARLISS 


Ivan Simpson has been signed 
for a role in George Arliss’ next 
Warner Brothers’ picture, “Old 
Fnglish.” Simpson has appeared 
in all Arliss’ plays for years. 


MURIEL 

STRYKER 

Fanchon and Harco’a 
DESERT IDEA 


TOOTS NOVELLO 

Fanchon and Marco’s 
“Overturet” Idea 
Direction Wm. Morris 


SOON AVAILABLE 

GEORGE and FLORENCE 

BALLET MASTER AND MISTRESS 

/ 

Now Vacationing After 68 Successful Weeks Producing 
Weekly Change in 

AUSTRALIA’S LARGEST THEATRE 

THE STATE, SYDNEY 

Producers Desiring Originality 
WRITE OR WIRE 
Permanent Address 

5126 Director, Seattle 



■□■□■□■□■□■□■□■□■□■□■nMnMnwnwnwnMnMnMnwnBnwnwnwnwnBDwnBDBDWDWD 


PAGE SIXTEEN 


INSIDE PACTS OF STAGE AND SCREEN 


SATURDAY, APRIL S, 1930 




Yesm 

"Philadelphia 


(By SAMUEL JOHN PARK) 


Has Gone HoWyuuood 


Produced at the Vine Street Theatre in Holly- 
wood on Sunday night, March 30th, and pro- 
claimed the most brilliant opening of the season. 


Pacific Coast tour to follow 

$ 

with these box office names: 

Rockcliffe Fellows Ora Carew 

Barbara Bedford Del Lawrence 

Franklyn Famum *» * ^ * » * * Kit Guard 
Frank Dawson ' Kitty Leeds ' James Gordon 

And a Brilliant Supporting Cast 

Thanks 

t 

Andy WHght 


NOW IN PREPARATION "SOUVENIR SADIE 


9 * 


To/t Building f Moltyu/ood 


Cable, WRIGHTBOOK, L. A. 








Scanned from the collection of 

Karl Thiede 


Coordinated by the 

Media History Digital Library 
www.mediahistoryproj ect.org